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  1. #11
    Dietmar Wolf's Avatar
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    Thank you Daniel. Your are right, of course. So I rescanned the neg right now.

    So here is the neg.-scan.





    1. I drew a blue line. Above that line I burned 1 stop. That means exact the same time as the base exposure of the entire print. 5 seconds. I cut out a mask and held it in the middle to burn.

    2. In the gallery, the right pic is printed at grade 2.5 ( http://www.apug.org/gallery/data/501/212.jpg ), the middle one at grade 3 ( http://www.apug.org/gallery/data/501/35.jpg ).

    3. toning is done just via inspection/appearance.

    Overall: I find it remarkable how much you can make out of a "boring" sky. I think it helped me that I do develop ID11 1+2, which gives greater grain. It is also remarkable how much sharpness the print gains just through increasing the grade.


    A very good thread! I hope to see some more.

    Best regards, Dietmar
    Last edited by Dietmar Wolf; 03-09-2008 at 02:55 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #12
    Stoo Batchelor's Avatar
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    Late Afternoon Sun ~ Sand patterns

    Hi Daniel

    Great Idea for a thread. Here is my contribution.

    The Negative

    Made with my Pentax 645n2 and a 75mm lens. The film was Delta 100 and it was developed in Pyrocat M. Most of my images are already made in my head. I then wander in the landscape looking for them. This negative was made on the August APUG weekend. It was about 4pm and the sun was low in the sky. I remember being quite excited by the sand patterns as I walked the beach with Ailsa McWinnie. The composition I was looking for would not come easy as you can see in the neg scan that the beach is dotted with ugly stones. In this situation I usually find that it is a good idea to step back a few yards and take a wider view. The rest of the visulisation can then be done after the negatives have been developed.(Post visualisation) I new from past experience that by exposing for the shadows, the sunlight glinting in the wet sand would burn out, and be paper white in the final print.

    The Print

    I was not disappointed with the negatives, though it was quite hard work looking for the final print in them, as at the time I did not have a negative scanner. It involved carefully studying them on a light box, which can be quite tedious. Once I had made my choice of negative to use. I made a full frame print. It was then just a case of using some lengths of mount board to mask of the print untill I saw the composition that I would finally go with. It should be noted that this is a process thet should not be rushed. Every ripple in the sand is exactly where I want it to be and I go to great pains to replicate them when I reprint this photograph.

    The negative was printed at grade 3 as I wanted the print to be quite High in contrast. It was important to me for the shadows to be right on their limit when it came to detail, and the highlights to 'SING'

    • The top of the print needed to be burnt in for 1/2 stop at grade 3

      The top right corner was burnt in for 1/2 a stop and the bottom left corner was burnt in for 3/4 stop, both at grade 3. This was to naturally frame the sunlight that travelled through the frame from top left to the bottom right corner.

      The final print was lightly bleached and then toned in a home made theo toner. This was heated up to about 35 degrees as I find it gives me a warmer sepia than at room temperature. After a short wash the print was then toned in selenium at 1-9 for about 1 1/2 mins.


    I am really happy with the final print and I know it sounds corny, but it is exactly as I saw it before I found it (in my minds eye)

    Best

    Stoo

    P.S The final print shown is a scan of the final print, not a manipulated neg scan. The tone is quite faithfull to the print.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails lateafternoonsun_negscan.jpg   late_afternoon_sun,sand_pat.jpg  
    Last edited by Stoo Batchelor; 03-09-2008 at 03:52 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: P.S
    _____________________________________________

  3. #13
    dlin's Avatar
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    Stoo,

    This is a beautiful print. Thanks for posting. I think it's a wonderful example of "post-visualization". It also demonstrates the importance of not allowing the dimensions of the format to constrain your vision.

    All the best,
    Daniel

  4. #14
    dlin's Avatar
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    Here is an example of an interpretation that is quite a departure from the straight negative. This scene was photographed in the morning at Lilly Pond in Eagle Creek Park, which is close to where I live in Indiana. I often drive through here on the way to work and get out for a quick walk if the light is interesting. What caught my attention were the swirling patterns in the duckweeds growing on the surface of the pond.

    Looking at the negative scan and playing around with levels allowed me to explore different possible interpretations. For me, this is one of the most powerful and time-saving aspects of working with a scanned negative image on the computer. I can play around with cropping and manipulate tonal representations, even with my most primitive computer skills, which can save an enormous amount of time, not to mention expensive paper, in the darkroom. It also allows me to visualize extreme changes that I might not consider otherwise.

    Negative: Fuji Acros developed in Pyrocat HD
    Paper: Ilford Galerie Grade 3 developed in ID-62

    For this print, I've flipped the image vertically and cropped from the square to remove extraneous elements.
    • The image was printed down quite drastically to create a more somber mysterious mood.
    • "Foreground" swirls were dodged during the main exposure
    • Top, left and right hand edges burned down after the main exposure
    • Processed and washed print toned in thiocarbamide using a presulfiding step, i.e. brief soak in the thiocarbamide toner bath prior to bleaching.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Lilly-Pond-Eagle-Creek-2.jpg   Lilly-Pond-Eagle-Creek.jpg  

  5. #15

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    Here's my most recent attempt at printing. A refreshing change as compared to anything I have printed previous. I think my final interpretation ended with little to no changes in actual composition. My inital framing of the scene was very tight. When I made this exposure I never expected the final print to look better than the original scene. For me this is a very rare occurrence. Warning: I would not suggest making this type of exposure unless you are completely aware of the potential dangers to man and camera.

    - First image: the scan of the negative.
    - Second image: my computer version of what I invisioned it might be prior to actual printing.
    - Third image: a scan of the final print.
    - And lastly an explanation of my burn sequence. When I mention "a graduated burn", that means the effect you would expect from using a graduated filter, but creating it with a blocking device such as cardboard.

    Lake Hefner, Oklahoma City, April 2008,
    5:30 PM, pointed into the sun.

    Camera: Voigtländer Avus 9x12cm + Zeiss orange filter
    Film: Efke PL 100 M
    Exposure: 1/50 sec @ F/11
    Dev: D-76 1:1

    Omega D2 + 135mm Rodenstock
    Paper: Fotokemika Varycon Matt FB 8x10
    Dev: Dektol 1:1
    Filter: #4 Kodak Polycontrast for entire print.

    I would really like to see the water less dense in the final print. I'm still working on it.
    Last edited by DannL; 09-08-2009 at 12:26 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Lo único de lo que el mundo no se cansará nunca es de exageración." Salvador Dalí

  6. #16
    Stoo Batchelor's Avatar
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    Daniel

    That is quite an amazing transformation from the original. I have recently adopted the use of a neg scan to see if i can take a print that little bit further. I have to admit though that I have never moved as far away from the original as you have here, though, knowing your skills in the darkroom, I am quite sure that you had this final vision of the print long before you opened the negative up in photoshop.

    I used to be quite sceptical of people who posted neg scans in the galleries, but since adopting this way of working I was very supprised to find that there is not anything I can do in photoshop that I can't do, and probably better, in the darkroom (with a printable negative)

    Thanks for sharing this beautiful image.

    Stoo

    Quote Originally Posted by dlin View Post
    Here is an example of an interpretation that is quite a departure from the straight negative. This scene was photographed in the morning at Lilly Pond in Eagle Creek Park, which is close to where I live in Indiana. I often drive through here on the way to work and get out for a quick walk if the light is interesting. What caught my attention were the swirling patterns in the duckweeds growing on the surface of the pond.

    Looking at the negative scan and playing around with levels allowed me to explore different possible interpretations. For me, this is one of the most powerful and time-saving aspects of working with a scanned negative image on the computer. I can play around with cropping and manipulate tonal representations, even with my most primitive computer skills, which can save an enormous amount of time, not to mention expensive paper, in the darkroom. It also allows me to visualize extreme changes that I might not consider otherwise.

    Negative: Fuji Acros developed in Pyrocat HD
    Paper: Ilford Galerie Grade 3 developed in ID-62

    For this print, I've flipped the image vertically and cropped from the square to remove extraneous elements.
    • The image was printed down quite drastically to create a more somber mysterious mood.
    • "Foreground" swirls were dodged during the main exposure
    • Top, left and right hand edges burned down after the main exposure
    • Processed and washed print toned in thiocarbamide using a presulfiding step, i.e. brief soak in the thiocarbamide toner bath prior to bleaching.
    _____________________________________________

  7. #17
    Stoo Batchelor's Avatar
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    Great image Dan. You must be well pleased with what you have so far. Will the final print be toned?

    Stoo



    Quote Originally Posted by DannL View Post
    Here's my most recent attempt at printing. A refreshing change as compared to anything I have printed previous. I think my final interpretation ended with little to no changes in actual composition. My inital framing of the scene was very tight. When I made this exposure I never expected the final print to look better than the original scene. For me this is a very rare occurrence. Warning: I would not suggest making this type of exposure unless you are completely aware of the potential dangers to man and camera.

    - First image: the scan of the negative.
    - Second image: my computer version of what I invisioned it might be prior to actual printing.
    - Third image: a scan of the final print.
    - And lastly an explanation of my burn sequence. When I mention "a graduated burn", that means the effect you would expect from using a graduated filter, but creating it with a blocking device such as cardboard.

    Lake Hefner, Oklahoma City, April 2008,
    5:30 PM, pointed into the sun.

    Camera: Voigtländer Avus 9x12cm + Zeiss orange filter
    Film: Efke PL 100 M
    Exposure: 1/50 sec @ F/11
    Dev: D-76 1:1

    Omega D2 + 135mm Rodenstock
    Paper: Fotokemika Varycon Matt FB 8x10
    Dev: Dektol 1:1
    Filter: #4 Kodak Polycontrast for entire print.

    I would really like to see the water less dense in the final print. I'm still working on it.
    _____________________________________________

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stoo Batchelor View Post
    Great image Dan. You must be well pleased with what you have so far. Will the final print be toned?

    Stoo
    Yes, it's a completely new path for me. In my first run I made some 5 prints. Several prints I made specifically to practice retouching and spotting, and I toned one print as a test in selenium. I am very pleased with that test. It's a very subtle purple tint using this paper.
    Last edited by DannL; 05-31-2008 at 06:49 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Lo único de lo que el mundo no se cansará nunca es de exageración." Salvador Dalí

  9. #19
    Seabird's Avatar
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    Thanks for an interesting thread Daniel. I've enjoyed others' contribution so lets try and reactivate things...

    Here's a fairly simple example of some selective burning. The first image is a straight print from the negative. The second image is the finished (manipulated) print - well, as it presently stands anyway...

    The grain of the rocks on the river bank was what initially caught my attention, and I've attempted to emphasise them by significant burning of the bush above the rock, and a bit of burning of the flowing water in front of the rock. I didn't want to completely loose the bush although that could easily be done. Corner burns and burns down the left and right edges complete the current printing strategy (although I'm still working on it).

    Never Never Creek, NSW Australia
    150 Apo-Symmar on my Technika with APX100 in the DDS
    Dev Rodinal 1:50 for 10mins
    Both prints on MG IV

    The bush and water burns are both 1 stop.

    Cheers

    Carey Bird
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Straight_C.jpg   Interp_c.jpg  

  10. #20
    dlin's Avatar
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    Carey,

    Thanks for posting your examples. It's quite a lovely scene.

    I had a couple questions regarding the burning sequence you've described. Are you using the same contrast filter as the main exposure for the burns? It looks like the foreground water was burned in using a lower contrast filter to bring down the highlights without pushing the tones in water down too far. Retaining detail in the background, which works here without competing with bright rock textures, can be achieved this way too.

    All the best,
    Daniel

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