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  1. #11
    Les McLean's Avatar
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    Robert,

    Use maximum magenta for the hard filtration but don't use maximum yellow for the soft filtration, all that happens is that you add density giving a longer exposure but with no significant increase in the degree of softness achieved. I've used all sorts of different enlargers in the 10 years that I have used this method of split grade printing and found that about 70 yellow is the optimum filtration.

  2. #12
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    Thanks, Les, I'll have to play around to find out what is best for me, but a starting point is always helpful!
    Let's see what I've got in the magic trash can for Mateo!

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  3. #13

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    On my Saunders 4550 VCCE it seems that the soft filtration is more nearly cyan then yellow. That makes sense since in additive color filtration of VC papers the colors used are blue and green. I think that Magenta is the subtractive of green and that Cyan is the subtractive of Yellow.
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by dnmilikan
    On my Saunders 4550 VCCE it seems that the soft filtration is more nearly cyan then yellow. That makes sense since in additive color filtration of VC papers the colors used are blue and green. I think that Magenta is the subtractive of green and that Cyan is the subtractive of Yellow.
    Correction, cyan is the subtractive of red, blue is the subtractive of yellow.

  5. #15

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    Hmmm. On my color enlarger the filtration is Magenta, Cyan and Yellow. I know that from what the manufacturers state the colors to which the variable contrast black and white papers are sensitive are blue and green. I know that my 4550 VCCE uses magenta and another color that doesn't really appear (to my eye anyway) as yellow. Perhaps I am color blind. It must be yellow though from what you say. Thanks for the information.
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

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  6. #16
    lee
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    Donald, if you use c and y together and add numbers you can reduce m. if you use c and m together and add numbers you can reduce y. maybe something like that is going on here. but glbeas is correct that cyan is the subtractive of red and yellow is the subtractive of blue and magenta is the subtractive of green. Are the colors wheels marked on the enlarger head? I would think that they should be. Just a thought.


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  7. #17

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    Lee,
    Nope on the 4550 the only designation is paper grade. On my older Omega medium format dichroic the colors are marked as I had indicated earlier. I imagine that what you are indicating must be the way that Saunders approaches the filtration for their VCCE head. It has been years since I worked with color (about 20) my memory doesn't serve me well after that long.
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  8. #18

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    I use a Leica V35 enlarger fitted with a Heiland dedicated splitgrade head, the two colours used are yellow and magenta.
    the process is automatic with the yellow exposed first followed by the magenta, there is also the facility to reverse the process and I can detect no difference either way in 12"x16" prints.
    Iam very happy with this system I hope this information helps.

  9. #19

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    Don, I think glbeas is color correct rather than b&w correct. Color head have Magenta, cyan, and yellow which are the colors of the dyes in color paper that are printed with green, red, and blue light respectively. Making red/cyan, green/magenta, and blue/yellow the proper opposites. But since b&w paper is orthochromatic the red of the equation gets thrown out which essentially makes your observation accurate as well.
    Embrace **it! **it. . .just another name for fertilizer. . . Grow baby Grow!

  10. #20

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    Based on everything said here, I tried split grade printing this weekend on some 16x20 I printed. The process was very easy and the prints turned out great. I noticed that the blacks seemed to be much richer, while the highlights maintain their crispness.

    It certainly sold me on the process.

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