Switch to English Language Passer en langue franšaise Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,862   Posts: 1,583,180   Online: 694
      
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 42
  1. #21
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,282
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by peters
    Ole-sorry to barge in on the thread but could you PLEASE post some results on the Bergger contact paper?. It's not really available here so would like to know
    Thanks Peter
    The PC my scanner's attached to is down, and I'm leaving home in 30 minutes. I won't be back before Sunday, and then I leave again for work. So no scans...

    It's a silver-rich very slow paper, but unlike AZO it's fast enough that it's possible to use it for enlarging. Expect exposure times of 1 minute if 10 seconds is "normal". It takes toning EXTREMELY well. I was suspecting my blue toner was getting tired, dropped in a BAC test strip: It went deep blue immediately... Like in 1 second, no 10-minute toning there!
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  2. #22
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,282
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    Trying to get back on topic:

    I use the same negative for all calibration - it's been sent as a postcard: The one from Lofoten. It's got an extremely long range, which is great for that use.

    Plonk neg in, adjust so that highlights (almost, but not quite paper white) reads 85 on the EM-10. Measure shadows, almost but not quite black: Read contrast grade off home-made chart.

    Dial in filtration , then adjust aperture and ND dial (yes, my enlarger has one) to read 85 in highlights again. Put paper in, expose 10 seconds (with Ilford MC IV RC) or else as appropriate for that paper.

    And that's it...
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Norwich, UK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,405
    Images
    90
    Quote Originally Posted by glbeas
    If the contrast was right after correcting the time the technique worked, you just need to calibrate to the paper speed. These methods really are just guideposts, once you get started with it take note of any deviations and corrections needed so you can apply them anytime you use that particular paper/developer/enlarger combo.
    Gary

    The contrast indicated was a very good guide in contrast determination (although the density range was smaller than I anticipated as my negs were flatter than I thought) but my main question was around the print exposure calibration. I will indeed need to conduct some tests to determine my print exposure.

    Ole

    Do you measure the initial range (density) with or without filters in place?

    Phill
    It is not tradition that secures the survival of our craft, its the craft that secures the survival of our traditions.

  4. #24
    titrisol's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Rotterdam
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,671
    Images
    8
    I did test my EM10, using a grayscale negative and closing 1 stop each time for each step.
    I have to dig those graphs and results

    But this makes sense, I basically do the same, measure shadow/highlight, decide how many f-stops between those (paper grade) and exposure
    Even though sometimes I base exposure on skin tones or some middle grays....
    Mama took my APX away.....

  5. #25
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,282
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by philldresser
    Do you measure the initial range (density) with or without filters in place?
    With my Opemus 6 I discovered to my considerable surprise that it doesn't matter at all! So I do it without filters, except the ND filter to fine-tune the illumination since my lens (Anaret S) has click-stops.

    The same range/contrast sheet works on the Durst 138S too, but I don't have a colour head on that. So I read the range, then do some convoluted mental arithmetic to convert it to seconds with blue and green colour-separation filters. Then I do a test, say "sod it all", and use graded papers.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  6. #26
    JeffD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    308
    Images
    10
    Can anyone tell me if the "relative density" on the graph Jorge is using represents density on the negative, or on the print?




    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge Oliveira
    I've received today an EM10 enlargement meter I've purchased at Ebay.
    Here are the first impressions:

    It works!

    I did not use it as per Ilford instructions - nor did I purchase it intending to.
    I used it as per:
    http://fox.vis.pl/filmy/ilford/em10graph.pdf

    One measures the higlights (equivalent to expose to the shadows) and get an approximate value of paper grade/filter from the graph.

    The main difference was, that in my case, exposure was not as suggested in the graph - 9s at a reading of 90 in the dial, but
    3s (?).


    I feel that with more tests, it will be a very helpful tool.

    Jorge O

  7. #27
    dschneller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Credit, ON Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    317
    Images
    34
    As I read it the relative density (vertical axis) refers to the negative. A RD of 0 will print as black and 1.5 will print as white. Or, taking a reading of the shadow area of the negative will read closer to 0 and taking a reading of the highlight area of the negative will read closer to 1.5.

    Dave
    "...slow down and start using photography to create an image, not just capture one." b.e.wilson

    "Speed kills, Del" Johnny Fever

  8. #28
    panchromatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Lansdale, PA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    218
    Images
    3
    How does this meter work using a multi-graded paper?
    --Ryan

    "The negative is the equivalent of the composer's score, and the print the performance." ~Ansel Adams

  9. #29
    JeffD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    308
    Images
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by panchromatic
    How does this meter work using a multi-graded paper?

    Read this whole thread, and look at the chart link, in the first post.

    Essentially the meter reads the dark and light areas of the scene, and figures out how much "density range" there is between the two values. The greater the number spread on the meter between these two values, the lower paper grade you should use.Knowing this, it can give you a grade you should use. The chart will tell you what grade, depending on the numeric results given by your meter.

    I don't use the Ilford or Kodak papers, but am thinking of making my own chart for Oriental VC paper using a stouffer step wedge and a spread sheet. Might make a good article, which I'll post if anyone is interested in this...

  10. #30

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Willamette Valley, Oregon
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,684
    Quote Originally Posted by panchromatic
    How does this meter work using a multi-graded paper?
    Jeff explains the EM-10's use as a crude densitometer which
    as was mentioned by the OP, Jorge Oliveira, not Ilford's intention.

    The EM-10 is a spot light meter used on the easel. It has red left
    and right and green centered LEDs and a turn-the-dial gain control
    indexed from 0 to 100. It's intended use provides for equal exposure
    when more than one size print is made. The lens aperature is adjusted
    so that correct exposure will result when the light is green. A good
    print, any size, must first be made.

    It can be used as a crude densitometer. Readings near 0 are
    thin areas and those near 100 are dense areas of the negative.
    The greater the spread the more contrasty your negative. I
    think it nice of Ilford that they numbered the dial. Dan

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  Ś   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin