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Thread: LPL c7700

  1. #11

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    I've just bought one of the LPLs and am very pleased with it. This looks like a good deal with all the extras, which I had to buy in addition to mine. It is a surprisingly large and substantial piece of kit and lovely to work with.

  2. #12

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    Just one more question does the LPL c7700 pro have a tilting head or the ability to move it to make larger prints than the baseboard. Thanks

  3. #13
    RH Designs's Avatar
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    Yes, both.
    Regards,
    Richard.

    RH Designs - My Photography

  4. #14
    Jon Shiu's Avatar
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    The head can rotate sideways, or you can rotate the column 180 degrees (and weight or clamp the baseboard) and project onto the floor.

    Jon
    Mendocino Coast Black and White Photography: www.jonshiu.com

  5. #15

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    I use a 7700 with a Rollei nameplate. My 7700 is configuration the same as the current Omega/LPL MXL 670. The best all-rounder of 6 enlargers I used is the 7700 considering it handles medium format. The six enlargers I am familier with are Omega's B-22, 23C, Leica V-35, 1c, 7700, and Omega D2. The 7700 is smaller than the 23II and D2, more refined than all but the Leica products, and will will not buckle MF negs like the B-22. You can swap the dichro head with a condensor to enlarge thin negs; especially useful for graded paper. The negative carriers are much better than the B-22 or 23C. It stays aligned which is a problem with the 23C.

    For a 6x7 enlarger it is in the top tier.
    RJ

  6. #16

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    Thanks everyone for all your help, with a few nervous moments in the closing seconds i won the enlarger for £100 which i feel is a good price. Thanks again Shakey

  7. #17

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    Congrats Shakey you beat me to it. Sounds like a good piece of kit.
    All the best with it.
    Raff

  8. #18

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    lol, you only cost me another £50!

    but am very happy with, also bought a new bulb for thinking it wasn't working only to realise that it just needed the insulating powder rubbing off the metal for it work.

  9. #19
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shakey View Post
    lol, you only cost me another £50!

    but am very happy with, also bought a new bulb for thinking it wasn't working only to realise that it just needed the insulating powder rubbing off the metal for it work.
    Congrats - nice kit!

    There were two last-minute bids, one at £80 and one at £99.99. It was the £99.99 one that put your win cost to £100 but that only pushed the winning price up by £15 as the £80 snipe would have put your winning price at £85 in any case. I do wish ebay would stop this "Bidder 1", "Bidder2" business - I know it is for security reasons but it makes it impossible to spot shill bidding...

    "Insulating powder" sounds odd. Not heard of a lamp base being deliberately coated in an insulating powder - possibly corrosion? Corroded aluminium is aluminium oxide which is white(ish) and insulating so that is what springs to mind. If it has been left lying around in a garage or somesuch that would probably explain that - IDK... [edit: ah - Richard to the rescue below!]

    Anyway, enjoy: that's good gear.

    Bob.
    Last edited by Bob F.; 06-26-2008 at 06:32 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #20
    RH Designs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shakey View Post
    also bought a new bulb for thinking it wasn't working only to realise that it just needed the insulating powder rubbing off the metal for it work.
    That's quite a common problem with that type of lamp, the pins corrode over time with all the heating and cooling. Make sure the pins are clean because otherwise it can cause flickering and inconsistent exposures. Replacement connectors are available, e.g. Maplin type VJ11M.
    Regards,
    Richard.

    RH Designs - My Photography

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