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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Jones View Post
    I use a small flashlight with the light diffused with
    masking tape for flashing small areas of a print.
    I wonder of the usefulness of such a technique. Flashing
    or even very light fogging affects only the otherwise purely
    white or thinest of highlight areas of the print. Your technique
    seems to me to be more of a non-image small area burning.
    Is that actually the effect you are after? Dan

  2. #12

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    After some advice from this site, I made up a diffussion sheet which I just place under the lens with the neg still in it. Its very fast to use and you can work out your flash times as a percentage of total time so that it works at any enlarger height. And of course you can adjust the flash time for more or less effect. And just because you are flashing doesn't mean you can't at the same time dodge the print so that the flash only affects the parts of the print you want it to.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by rob champagne View Post
    After some advice from this site, I made up a
    diffusion sheet which I just place under the lens
    with the neg still in it.
    I probably worry too much but wonder if the
    possible image pass through might not slew the
    results. Image pass through is greatest just where
    addition exposure is not wanted, the shadows. Where
    additional exposure is wanted, the highlight areas,
    the least amount of light is reaching the paper.
    In fact the very dense areas of the negative
    may pass so little light as to not affect the
    paper at all.

    My technique eliminates the image pass through
    issue. After exposure I stop the lens down to f45
    then carefully remove the negative with carrier.
    With timer set to some very short time the
    paper is wholly exposed to the enlarger's
    even light. Dan

  4. #14
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Testing showed that a plastic cup mixed an image perfectly.

    A filter holder beneath the lens and a sheet of Tough Rolux is perfect,
    and doesn't need to be held. Milk Glass, plain paper, almost anything works.

    Simple doesn't exclude sound technique; rationalism's weakness is that we can convince ourselves of anything.
    Testing proves what works.

    Printing an edition justifies a special lightsource for flashing if you have room. A small enlarger is perfect.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    I probably worry too much but wonder if the
    possible image pass through might not slew the
    results. Image pass through is greatest just where
    addition exposure is not wanted, the shadows. Where
    additional exposure is wanted, the highlight areas,
    the least amount of light is reaching the paper.
    In fact the very dense areas of the negative
    may pass so little light as to not affect the
    paper at all.

    My technique eliminates the image pass through
    issue. After exposure I stop the lens down to f45
    then carefully remove the negative with carrier.
    With timer set to some very short time the
    paper is wholly exposed to the enlarger's
    even light. Dan
    I wondered about that BUT this is a diffusion sheet and that means light from the whole image is diffused over the whole of the paper and not just the light from the bit of the negative you want to flash. A diffusion sheet evens everything out so what hits the paper is non image forming and NOT dependant on one part of the negative. But you do need the right amount of diffusion. I don't have it to hand but I think I used four 4 or 5 layers of Lee lighting diffusion sheet which for which I use 10% of print time (+ or - if necessary). It works very well and is a breeze to use.

  6. #16
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Jim Jones
    I use a small flashlight with the light diffused with
    masking tape for flashing small areas of a print.

    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    I wonder of the usefulness of such a technique. Flashing
    or even very light fogging affects only the otherwise purely
    white or thinest of highlight areas of the print. Your technique
    seems to me to be more of a non-image small area burning.
    Is that actually the effect you are after? Dan
    I use it both for reducing unwanted highlights and for darkening skies a bit around the edges of the image.

  7. #17

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    Flashing gives the whole image a dull look. You can burn in the area with a lower contrast filter, you can make shapes with your hand or you can cut out the shape from a cardboard, just make sure you are moving your hand or the board so the edges are not sharp. Put the blown out part of the picture in warm water for few seconds and go back to the dev.(this method is not working for RC paper)
    Practice to see what works for you. Good luck.

  8. #18
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Feketefeher View Post
    Flashing gives the whole image a dull look.. Put the blown out part of the picture in warm water for few seconds and go back to the dev.
    ... As in a two stage process..? I've done a LOT of "pre-flashing" to control (reduce) contrast ... but always independent of development. I can't see where an intermediate water bath would have an effect - ANY effect - but, I'll have to try it.

    (this method is not working for RC paper)
    Strange - I've always used "pre-flashing" on both RC as well as fiber papers - and EXTENSIVELY with RA-4 Color - all with great success.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  9. #19
    hka
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Sukach View Post
    Strange - I've always used "pre-flashing" on both RC as well as fiber papers - and EXTENSIVELY with RA-4 Color - all with great success.
    Ed,
    Can you explain how you do that on RA-4 Color??
    harry

    Release, the best you can do...

  10. #20
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hka View Post
    Ed,
    Can you explain how you do that on RA-4 Color??
    Oh, boy.... I've done this so many times ... yet, I never have had to write it down.

    Here goes... I use the ColorStar 3000 extensively ...

    First, the "pre-flash":

    Either using some sort of diffusion media - or possibly ... nothing ....in the negative carrier of the enlarger, analyze a complete frame of light ... adjusting Cyan, Magenta and Yellow filters to produce a "neutral gray." Adjust the aperture to the produce a ten second (suggested) exposure. For the pre-flash exposure, reduce the TIME and expose for two seconds (~20%) Note 1.

    Remove and secure the pre-flashed paper.

    For the main exposure, analyze the frame to be printed. Adjust cyan, magenta and yellow filtration. Set the aperture to ten seconds - place the pre-flashed paper in the easel, and complete the exposure with an actual time of eight (8) seconds.

    Process as normal.

    This has worked wonders in a situation as photographing girls in white Wedding Gowns - and "colored" Bridesmaid's dresses ... in *BRIGHT*, direct, July sunlight. With care, the texture of the white fabric is THERE (!!) and the shadows are NOT blocked.

    This will take an amount of trial-and-error... but in my book it is well worth the effort.

    Note 1; Yeh, I know it is not theoretically 20%. It's somewhere around there ... good enough for f/63. You might need more - 30% or so.

    I hope this makes sense .. at least enough to get you started. It has been a rough day of medical procedures. Questions will be gladly answered - later.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

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