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  1. #11
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    So, how was dinner?
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by fong View Post
    So I'm back at home now, and I just checked the bulb in my Beseler 23C II: the markings on the bulb indicate it's a GE 200 W (EJL) bulb. I got this enlarger second-hand many years ago along with a copy of the manuals. I'm using the dual dichro head in diffusion mode; the manual for the colour head suggests a 250 W (EVW) bulb so I guess I'm using a lower-powered bulb than is recommended.

    I wouldn't be surprised if there was something wrong with the dichro head, though. Moving the yellow filter dial doesn't seem to adjust anything -- I guess there's a loose connection somewhere.
    I would think 75W more appropriate for a 23C
    Mark
    Mark Layne
    Nova Scotia
    and Barbados

  3. #13

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    @Thomas - Ha! In the end, pragmatism won out over darkroom work. Dinner was fine.

    @Mark - I think the 23C's condenser head uses a 75 W bulb, but the dichro head seems to want a stronger 250 W bulb (that's what my copy of the manual says anyway). Of course, I could just be reading that wrong...

  4. #14
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Have you checked to see if the 23C has a lever that swings the filters out of the light path for focussing? My 4x5 Dichro has is and that will make all the filters inoperative. If this is the problem and you get control of the filters back you can also add ND filtration by dialing in all filters the same amount until you get workable times.
    Gary Beasley

  5. #15
    bsdunek's Avatar
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    Did you forget to turn off the room white light? I know that sounds stupid, but I know a person that did just that. Couldn't understand why all his prints were black. Happens to the best of us.:rolleyes:
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
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    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by glbeas View Post
    Have you checked to see if the 23C has a lever that swings the filters out of the light path for focussing? My 4x5 Dichro has is and that will make all the filters inoperative. If this is the problem and you get control of the filters back you can also add ND filtration by dialing in all filters the same amount until you get workable times.
    Gary,

    Only the yellow filter dial does not seem to move the filter in and out. I seem to be able to manipulate the filter manually inside the colour head (although because the lamp goes off when you open the top, I can't confirm whether it actually does anything), so I think the dial must have somehow disconnected from the sliding filter assembly... I did some quick searching on how I might be able to fix it, but so far, nothing. In any event, I agree that the filtration is probably not causing my problem, but it would be nice to fix this anyway.

  7. #17

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    Perhaps your negatives are a bit thin? Also if you are printing small prints and the head is close to the paper, you'll need to stop down more or lengthen your times (generally).

    You could remove the negative and raise the head halfway, zero out all filtration and make a test strip of the white light to make sure you can get a gradation on paper, just to verify things..

  8. #18
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    yellow filter fix?

    a lot of dichroics have a glass filter that is on a pivot point, with a spring that wants to pull it in the direction of being fully on the light path. Opposing this is a cam that holds the filter back, but moves to let more of the filter into the light path as you dial in more filtration. I have seen situations where transporting the enlarger lets a bolt or two loosen, and then something falls out of alignment.


    Once you get past the black paper problem, I would suggest open the enlarger head up, and see what yours is doing. If the yellow cam/filter holder is totaly stuffed, consider the possibility of moving the yelow filter to the cyan dial mechanism. Unless you print cibachrome, which is pretty rare nowadays, the times you need cyan are very very rare.
    my real name, imagine that.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Layne View Post
    I would think 75W more appropriate for a 23C
    Mark
    Not for a dichro head, which is what the OP has. These things suck up a lot of light and are designed for printing color negatives (far more dense than normal B&W negatives( through a filter pack. The lamp needs to be very powerful to overcome these obstacles.

    Of course, print size and negative density have a lot to do with exposure times. I'm running an Omega D4 which uses a 250 watt, 24 volt ELC lamp. With all the filters out of the light path, I can get 4 to 6 second exposure times at f/8 with a 50 mm lens to make an 8x10 print from a 35 mm negative. To keep things somewhat manageable, I need to drastically reduce the amount of light hitting the negative. Fortunately, my lamphouse has a built in attenuator that cuts out about 2 1/2 stops of light. If the enlarger has such a device, use it. If not, then consider placing some neutral density filters in the light path. Rosco theatrical lighting gels work fine for this.
    Frank Schifano

  10. #20

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    Well, I managed to fix the yellow filter by taking apart the dichro head and applying a little bit of oil to the "arm" that rubs against the front filter dial that controls the yellow filter inside the head. The joint where the arm connects to the casing was very stiff, which meant that there was no spring-back action as the dial was closed, hence the yellow filter just stayed in its position. I'm hoping the oil doesn't eventually gum up and make things worse (I have a sneaking suspicion it just might), but I really couldn't figure out any other way of getting it looser. My first choice was WD-40, but since I didn't have that, a very light application of vegetable oil seems to have done the trick for now.

    With the head newly-repaired, I am planning on heading back into the bathroom, er, darkroom tomorrow...

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