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  1. #11
    jeroldharter's Avatar
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    I graduated from college in 1984 and still have some of my first RC prints which are in fine condition despite marginal storage conditions at times. If I were a student again, I would start with RC paper which is much easier and quicker to process, and cheaper as well.
    Jerold Harter MD

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob F. View Post
    The general opinion from the manufacturers is that modern RC paper will last pretty much as long as fibre. The problems of previous decades have, they insist, been ironed out (no pun intended ).
    FWIW, I've found that Foma's RC paper (or at least the Variant III VC RC paper) silvers out in about 1-2 years when tossed in a cheap frame. Agfa's MCP 310RC paper, processed identically, doesn't do so -- at least not as quickly. (My oldest B&W prints are about 4 years old.) Perhaps the Foma is more sensitive to fixing and/or washing issues than the Agfa, and the Foma would be OK if I'd processed them in a slightly different way. Foma prints that have not been framed seem OK up to at least 3 or 4 years. As it is, I'm not going to buy more Foma RC paper.

  3. #13
    eddym's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jp80874 View Post
    I have been using Kentmere Fine print VC FB for about three years for 7x17 contacts cut from 16x20 and 20x24 enlargements. If dried over night between two screens the prints rarely need much flattening. Last night I put them under a stack of prints for an hour rather than warm up the press.

    John Powers
    When I have tried drying larger prints between two screens, I invariably get uneven drying. Or rather, the print is dry all over, but is "wavy" or "warped," as if it dried faster in one spot than another. There are probably better words to describe this, but I can't think of them... Anyway, I let them dry for a little while on screens, them hang them overnight. They curl, of course, but they are more easily flattened under a stack of books this way. If I leave them between the screens, the stack of books will not flatten them evenly.
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by eddym View Post
    When I have tried drying larger prints between two screens, I invariably get uneven drying. Or rather, the print is dry all over, but is "wavy" or "warped," as if it dried faster in one spot than another. There are probably better words to describe this, but I can't think of them... Anyway, I let them dry for a little while on screens, them hang them overnight. They curl, of course, but they are more easily flattened under a stack of books this way. If I leave them between the screens, the stack of books will not flatten them evenly.
    Are you using a different paper?
    Would the difference in humidity between Puerto Rico and Cleveland, OH cause this? Sorry, I can only offer these two guesses as to the different results.

    John Powers

  5. #15
    eddym's Avatar
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    Nope, same paper. And my darkroom is dehumidified/air conditioned, so the humidity is always around 40-50%.
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  6. #16
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    In severe cases, I do as others suggest and mist the backs of the prints. Then I use several pieces of very oversized pristine blotter paper, placed between two 20x24 inch pieces of 3/4 inch plywood. Overnight they are flat.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  7. #17
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeroldharter View Post
    I graduated from college in 1984 and still have some of my first RC prints which are in fine condition despite marginal storage conditions at times. If I were a student again, I would start with RC paper which is much easier and quicker to process, and cheaper as well.
    ******
    Archival is, what, 50 years. So in 2034 one may adjudge the RC prints safe. Until then.......
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  8. #18
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    Huh... go figure...I never thought to press them when damp...I always dry them first, and then flatten in a hot press. I use a screen on top of a screen to dry, so they dry out pretty flat, just a little wavy. When they are dry, I slide them in the press. Viola!

  9. #19

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    No problems with any of my 20 year old RC prints.

  10. #20
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    I'm with J. Brunner's method -- although for an upcoming show, it'll be a few weeks between mounting/framing them and having had them dry out between two screens.

    Blotter paper 20 or more inches wide is a tad hard to find!

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