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  1. #31

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    Just had a look at the dryer and I stand corrected. it's...

    cardboard
    interfacing
    print
    interfacing
    1/8" foam
    cardboard

  2. #32
    Akki14's Avatar
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    Just make sure you buy non-fusible interfacing. The fusible kind is like a sheet of iron-on tape so you definately do not want to heat that stuff with your prints sandwiched between them!
    Interfacing is very thin, slightly see-through spun polyester. It's slightly stiff and used to give more "body" to thinner fabrics when sewing.
    ~Heather
    oooh shiny!
    http://www.stargazy.org/

  3. #33

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    [QUOTES=Akki14;695328]
    "Just make sure you buy non-fusible interfacing.
    The fusible kind is like a sheet of iron-on tape so
    you definately do not want to heat that stuff with
    your prints sandwiched between them!"

    I used to call my dryer a corrugated board BLOTTER
    stack dryer. But polyester is hydrophobic; realising
    that I dropped the BLOTTER. After sponge drying
    prints are placed twixt two sheets of interfacing.

    I wonder at what temperature that fusible material
    works? I seem to recall that it comes wide. Do you
    suppose it would work as a mount tissue?

    "Interfacing is very thin, slightly see-through spun
    polyester. It's slightly stiff and used to give more
    "body" to thinner fabrics when sewing."

    I've found it loose spun and calendered; the later
    easy to handle. Also available in varying weights.
    Those looking for a very low cost paper blotter
    substitute of ANY size should give it a look.

    Sponge drying before hand draws water from
    the surfaces. Their is little to no transfer of fluid
    from the print to those hydrophobic surfaces.
    I think good for several well washed prints
    prior to cleaning or replacement. Dan

  4. #34
    Akki14's Avatar
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    Ironing temperatures. You'd have to read the instructions on it or ask for advice at the fabric shop. I'm not sure you'd really want to use it for mounting tissue as I think it's thicker than mounting tissue and there's no guarantees on how long it'll last. I'm just basing my comments on what I've worked with for sewing purposes. I've previously only heard it mentioned here in respects to keeping FB papers separated in wash water.
    ~Heather
    oooh shiny!
    http://www.stargazy.org/

  5. #35

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    [QUOTES=Akki14;695709]
    "Ironing temperatures."

    Those vary. Quit low for some. As a mounting 'tissue'
    fusible interfacing would need tack some where around
    200 farenheight.

    "I've previously only heard it mentioned here in respects
    to keeping FB papers separated in wash water."

    Used with tray soaking they make for a horizontal
    still water slot washer. Two trays are needed. Prints
    and separators are transfered one by one from the
    hold/soak tray to the first soak tray. The transfers
    continue for as many soaks as are needed. Very
    little water is used.

    To reduce water usage even further my first transfer
    from FRESH water includes the water itself. The water
    is first transfered to the second tray then the prints and
    separators peeled off and arranged. Water usage is
    minute compared with even the slowest running
    water washers.

    For those interested and who use fixer in the usual
    way I suggest: from fix, rinse, hca, rinse, hold/soak,
    and 3 soaks. As few as 2 may do, depending upon ...
    For greatest water savings, transfer FRESH
    water once.

    Room temperature water may be used because so
    little water is used. My last soak is overnight and
    then some. No problems. HT-2 tests prove
    negative; no retained fixer.

    Serious about saving water? Dan

  6. #36
    Kekhotep's Avatar
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    Where can I find blotting paper, or please reccomend some.

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