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  1. #11

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    Donald, won't applying a dodge mask sandwiched with the negative cause sharp edge effects (halo's, etc) since it will be pretty weel focused along with the negative, as opposed to std dodge and burn wiggling which blends those areas with surrounding areas? How does that work/apply for say dodging some 2-3mm (1/8") eyeballs?

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nige
    Donald, won't applying a dodge mask sandwiched with the negative cause sharp edge effects (halo's, etc) since it will be pretty weel focused along with the negative, as opposed to std dodge and burn wiggling which blends those areas with surrounding areas? How does that work/apply for say dodging some 2-3mm (1/8") eyeballs?
    Nige,

    You pose a very good question.

    The reason that the demarcation that you question will not occur is that one only dodges using this mask for "a portion of the print exposure time". Obviously if the high density sharp mask were printed in register with the camera negative throughout the entire print exposure the effect would be to totally block exposure to the affected area. If one uses a registration system that is accurate then the affected area is affected in a very precise manner.

    Conversely if one does the cruder method of making a mask using opaque then the best method would be to make a mask the size of the final print and the fashion a "jiggle frame". The "jiggle frame" is a frame that allows the mask to be positioned over the print in a manner that the frame is supported at each of the corners by a weak tension compression spring. This allows the frame and mask to be "lightly jiggled" throughout the period of dodging or burning operation. If I were inclined to try this method, I would make the frame in such a manner that the frame would be built to my largest print size and in which the support for the mask could be adjusted downward in size.

    I hope that I have answered your questions. Please feel free to address the matter again if you have further concerns or if I have failed to adequately communicate to you.

  3. #13

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    that makes more sense to me... although I'll be sticking to my sheet of acetate for dodging eyeballs as I find it works fine. thanks for the explanation.

  4. #14

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    I must admit I am with Anne in how I make a mask. I just get a reject print and use a scalpel to cut it out and then hold it just above the paper on the easel. But, most important with this technique is to move it about to mthe right degree. Too much and you get a halo, too little and you get sharp edges. Takes practice but is easy to do after a while.

  5. #15

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    Don,

    I believe Brett Weston used some sort of jiggle frame for some of his printing.

    I also recall an article in View Camera about using a frosted piece of acetate in register with the negative and using a pencil to shade areas to be dodged. When I get a chance I will find the issue and provide author and date of the issue.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim68134
    Don,

    I believe Brett Weston used some sort of jiggle frame for some of his printing.

    I also recall an article in View Camera about using a frosted piece of acetate in register with the negative and using a pencil to shade areas to be dodged. When I get a chance I will find the issue and provide author and date of the issue.
    Jim,

    I have not heard of Brett Weston using a "jiggle frame". Though it may very well be true. I have heard of a jiggle frame before and it was indicated as being effective by the person relating. Have you used it in your printing?

  7. #17

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    Another method that has not been addressed is a method that Blansky uses all of the time. That is retouching the negative. In talking with him, I learned that he does this a lot in his portraiture.

    I recently bought an Adams retouching machine and have used it in retouching some of my negatives. The technique takes some practice but works very well. I have retouched some fairly sizeable areas. By applying the retouching dyes the negative density is increased...this has the effect of allowing one to burn down the other areas, if desired. It could be used as only a dodging method too.

    The dyes that I use are sold by Veronica Cass. This is a reversible procedure. If too heavy a application of dye results, one can rewash the negative and start over.

  8. #18

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    Jim,
    There was also an article last year in Photo Techniques, Howard Bond I think, where he discusses the same thing. Used frosted acetate, on one side only, and used a pencil to 'dodge' a tree line I think. Have considered trying this, but Don's suggestions seems a little easier, since it does not require the registration of the acetate and negative.
    Mike C

    Rambles

  9. #19
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    I have tried just about every method mentioned in this thread except the "jiggle frame" and discard them in favour of the method I'll describe, mainly because I find it quick to set up and very effective.

    For burning in I use a piece of black card that has become very pliable after years of bending into the shape required to burn in the area in question. When the card was new and was bent to a shape it cracked so I taped it over with masking tape. After a few years of doing this it became very soft as I was able to bend it form just about any shape I wanted. I got the idea from this to use a piece of heavy industrial rubber, such as the sort used on entrances in warehouses where forklifts etc run through. This did not work so I returned to my bit of black card. Apugers who attended my workshops in San Francisco and Calgary will tell you how effective it is. When burning in hold the card as near to the lens as possible, this producesa penumbra which is a wide softened area that is projected on to the baseboard which allows you to feather the area being burned in to the adjacent area that you are holding back.

    For difficult dodging I lay 3 or 4 boxes of paper on the base board and place a piece of white light card and project the image on to it. I then draw around the area to be dodged, cut out the shape making the edges ragged and stick it to a piece of flower arranging wire. I remove the boxes project the image and by holding the dodging tool at the same height as the boxes were, thus ensuring that the size of the dodging tool matches the size of the area on the baseboard to the area being dodged. A slight up and down movement ensures that there is no tell tale halo.

  10. #20

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    Don,

    I thought I had read it in an article in Photo Techniques several years ago, but now I can't find it.
    I am pretty sure it was Brett, but I may be confusing it with someone else. Perhaps Michael Smith can clarify when he gets a chance.

    I have not used one and your mention of it was the only other time I have heard of the device.

    I have used spottone on occaision in experiments but have yet to get consistent results. Usually I use a very dilute solution and build up the density of the area, but I have not done enough to be able to make a good estimate of the effect when printing.

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