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  1. #1
    csb999's Avatar
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    two newbie questions

    I recently got an Omega D2V, and I am having a blast printing my 4x5 negatives! I have two questions:

    1) Instead of cutting test strips from 11x14 and 16x20 paper, I was thinking that I'd just use 1/3 or 1/2 sheets of 8x10 and stick it in an area where I can assess exposure. I pretty much use Ilford MGIV RC. Is there any reason not to do this? I would be using the exact same paper (hopefully about the same age), just a different size. I understand there could be contrast differences if one of the papers was substantially older than the other.

    2) I'm interested in trying some fiber paper also. Would exposure times be identical, or is some adjustment necessary? (I've never printed on fiber before) That is to say, if I am happy with a print I made on RC, can I use the same time and aperture settings for an identical sized fiber print?

    Thanks for helping a newb!

  2. #2
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    1) There is some risk that the paper might not be identical (there are slight variations by batch, and as you pointed out the age of the paper makes a difference). If you just want to get in the ballpark, it'll work, but if you want to be precise you're best to use test prints made from the same batch of the same paper.

    2) Generally, no, you can't do this. I find that when I make a print on Ilford MG IV glossy RC, I can use the same settings and make a very satisfactory print on Ilford MG IV glossy FB, as long as I extend the development time, but again, the batches are obviously different. I use my RC settings as a starting point. Most times I don't need to adjust it, but once in awhile I do. I would expect paper from other manufacturers to be less consistent but I haven't specifically tested yet (so far, all my fibre prints have been on MG IV).
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  3. #3

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    I use a full sheet with test exposure strips no matter if its an 8x10 or 16x20, fiber or RC paper. I pick the best test exposure strip and print the whole print. Then I decide if I need to increase the contrast, dodge or burn. There is a difference in exposure between fiber and RC, and between different manufacturers.

    Good luck

  4. #4
    David Brown's Avatar
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    1) I do this - make test strips from 8x10 paper of the same exact type as a larger paper. Yes, there can be some variations, but afterall, it is just a test strip. You're likely to make finer adjustments after you start on the final full size print anyway. Having said that, sometimes I cut test strips out of the very paper I'm using. It depends on how many prints/test strips I'll make that session with the larger paper.

    2) When switching types of papers, make a new test strip - with the new paper.
    David
    Taking pictures is easy. Making photographs is hard.

    http://www.behance.net/silverdarkroom
    http://silverdarkroom.wordpress.com

  5. #5

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    What Mr. Mackenzie wrote. The emulsions might be the same, but there are always slight batch to batch variations. Whenever I open a new pack of paper, I sacrifice a couple of sheets to make some strips and patches. The patches are usually 2 x 2 inches. You can get a lot of these from even a single 8x10 sheet. I was never a fan of making the traditional type of test strip. What I do is take a few small pieces of paper and place them at strategic points withing the composition, then make several exposures to determine the base exposure and any necessary dodging and burning manipulation.
    Frank Schifano



 

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