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  1. #31
    eddie's Avatar
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    Another option would be to use a longer lens, which would require having the lamp head higher, for the same size enlargement.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    Another option would be to use a longer lens, which would require having the lamp head higher, for the same size enlargement.
    This sounds like a great idea, but it doesn't work.

    The intensity of light at the baseboard is a function of the intensity of the light source, the aperture of the lens, and the magnification ratio between the original negative and the resulting print.

    So changing lenses and raising the lamp head makes no difference, because the resulting magnification ends up being the same.

    It may benefit you in one way though. A shorter lens may go only to f/16, whereas a longer lens may offer f/22 or even f/32 minimum apertures.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #33
    eddie's Avatar
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    Well, it's worked for me for decades. I don't do much 35mm but, when I did print small, there was definitely a difference in the time required for a 50mm lens, and an 80mm lens, for the same size enlargement.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    Well, it's worked for me for decades. I don't do much 35mm but, when I did print small, there was definitely a difference in the time required for a 50mm lens, and an 80mm lens, for the same size enlargement.
    Did your enlarger have adjustable condensers or mixing boxes that, when set for the longer lens, would affect the intensity of the light reaching the negative?
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #35
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    No. Cold light.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by winger View Post
    Since this enlarger is new to you, the first thing I would check is to make sure you have the right bulb.
    A kind member who seems to have deep knowledge of this rig confirmed with me privately that the bulb is correct.

    Also double check that your lens doesn't have a lever to open it up for focusing and if it was open rather than stopped down.
    Confirmed this.

    For a 5x7 from 35mm, I'm fairly sure I use f16 to get times I can use and that still just gets me around 8-10 seconds. I know the old rule about always stopping down two stops from fully open, but I consider that to be bordering on BS, depending on the lens (I have Componon S lenses and they certainly don't suck). If you shouldn't ever ever ever use the other apertures, they wouldn't be there.
    The interesting thing is I have a pile of salvaged paper of unknown origin. The old Luminos paper was about 1 f/stop faster than the old ILFORD post card stock. With the ILFORD post card stock I was able to get into 6 seconds at f/11. I have some fresh ILFORD 5x7 coming so I'll have some known good paper stock to work with soon.

  7. #37

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    A very recognisable problem. So short printing times are very hard hard to adjust precisely and burning an dodging are very difficult. Using contrast filters will help you a bit as they eat some of the light. So will getting a lower wattage lamp. I ended up using a 3 stop neutral density filter I can screw on the lens. You can also use a nd filter you can put into the filter drawer of your enlarger.

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