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  1. #11
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Lindan View Post
    ... Overdevelopment, if the film has received proper exposure, isn't all that deadly.
    ...
    Maybe not deadly, but, after underexposure, the worst I can think of. Having said that, slight overdevelopment is easily corrected with a softer grade or some dodge or burn. However, even modes overdevelopment is pretty tough to correct.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  2. #12
    eclarke's Avatar
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    Bleach them....Evan Clarke

  3. #13

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    Reshoot

    JY

  4. #14
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eclarke View Post
    Bleach them....Evan Clarke
    If you do that with anything than a proportional reducer, the contrast will increase. Farmers Reducer, for example, will make it worse. Proportional reducers work, but they are only worth the effort if you really need these images. Otherwise, reshoot, as someone said, or write them off as a learning experience.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  5. #15
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    re shooting is certainly an option. I am trying to take this opportunity to learn from a mistake. If ti fix is too complicated then at this stage it is not worth it. If it were a shot of a lifetime...but it is not.
    Know how to recover from one's mistakes is very valuable knowledge.
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
    Flicker http://www.flickr.com/photos/stradibarrius
    website: http://www.dudleyviolins.com
    Barry
    Monroe, GA

  6. #16
    eclarke's Avatar
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    Persulfate bleach....EC

  7. #17

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    Reserve any chemical treatment of the negatives as a last resort - it is fairly easy to reduce density chemically, far harder to reduce contrast unless you use a sub-proportional reducer, and you will increase grain in all cases.

    Solution #1: Buy some variable contrast paper (such as Ilford Multigrade) and a set of filters and try printing with #00 filter.

    Solution #2: Try waterbath development - expose a print heavily, start its development in normal print dev for some seconds and then remove the print and place it in a bath of plain water at 20 degrees C and leave it there WITHOUT AGITATION. The print can be move back and forth between baths, this will bring up the highlights somewhat relative to the shadows.

    Solution #3: Print with a flashing exposure. Print the negative normally and then give an additional exposure without the negative in the enlarger, having previously determined the length of this exposure by test - it is the exposure JUST LESS than the minimum required to produce a visible density in the print (the idea is that the flashing exposure and the highlight exposure each on their own produce no density, but combined they do).

    Only after that consider contrast-reducing masks. These will work, but they work by adding density selectively to the shadow parts of the negative and thus make the overall exposure longer - as printing exposures get very long, reciprocity law failure sets in and contrast goes up!

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