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  1. #11

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    By calling the skies a "bland grey", do you mean that you want the skies to be brighter or darker? What tone of grey are they now?
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  2. #12

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    I cannot thank all of you enough for taking the time to respond with such wonderful suggestions. Let me add that at this time in Florida ( our dry season ) there are usually NOT as many clouds as most of you associate with this part of the country. Hence, the sky is an endless blue which prints, of course, as a shade of gray across the top of the print.

    Ed

  3. #13
    DJGainer's Avatar
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    Just remember when you are burning-in the sky to make sure that your motion overlaps the top of the land/sea horizon. If you don't, you'll end up with a light area just above the horizon in the lowest part of the sky.

  4. #14

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    Good questions...to my eye the skies are zone V, although as I examine the dry prints today I do notice that there is some range of grays from a lighter zone V to a slightly darker zone V ( if the parsing of the tones makes any sense to you... )

    Ed


    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    By calling the skies a "bland grey", do you mean that you want the skies to be brighter or darker? What tone of grey are they now?

  5. #15
    DJGainer's Avatar
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    The other problem with burning in an empty sky is that as you get into Zone IV and III, it may take on a drab look. When clouds are present it can develop a dramatic look, but without them you run the risk of making the print look boring (depending on the foreground)

  6. #16
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    Use a #0 filter to burn the sky, or other highlights. It will have little effect on anything darker than about Zoner VI.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  7. #17
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    I use split grade or 00 with shorter time than below horizon which may be 2 or 1.5. You say the sky is blue much of the time, something difficult to comprehend in the Cleveland area. Can you shoot when there are storms or some form of clouds so that burning with a lower grade will show some detail? I don't know, we Yankees may have to stop feeling sorry for you hurricane victims if we have to read any more about cloudless blue skies day after day.

    Le Gray had an even bigger problem (1856-59) when the emulsions registered nothing on a bland sky. He solved it by pairing or overlapping negatives from a real storm with a below the horizon tranquil day. Search for “Mediterranean Sea at Sete”.
    http://www.metmuseum.org/store/st_fa...3CD2EF10261%7D

    John Powers

  8. #18

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    Thanks John. No kidding...lots of sunny days with high blue skies, although considerably colder then normal. Of course, colder means ( except we have had some plant killing freezes this year-very unusual even in Northern Florida ) in the 60's and 70's during the day with 50's and 60's at night. The denizens here get bent out of shape when they have to take out their wool coats.

    Thanks for the printing advice. I hope it get nicer in Cleveland.

    Ed

  9. #19
    eclarke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jp80874 View Post
    I use split grade or 00 with shorter time than below horizon which may be 2 or 1.5. You say the sky is blue much of the time, something difficult to comprehend in the Cleveland area. Can you shoot when there are storms or some form of clouds so that burning with a lower grade will show some detail? I don't know, we Yankees may have to stop feeling sorry for you hurricane victims if we have to read any more about cloudless blue skies day after day.

    Le Gray had an even bigger problem (1856-59) when the emulsions registered nothing on a bland sky. He solved it by pairing or overlapping negatives from a real storm with a below the horizon tranquil day. Search for “Mediterranean Sea at Sete”.
    http://www.metmuseum.org/store/st_fa...3CD2EF10261%7D

    John Powers
    Sometimes it's just better no to make the photograph. I'm in Milwaukee and we have the same issue with skies. I was lucky enough to find 4x5 resin contrast (red, yellow and orange) filters in a gradient from color to clear. I use them with my Lee filter holder and it really is effective for bringing down the sky without altering the landscape..Evan Clarke

  10. #20

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    Thanks Evan. I had purchased the ND gradient set from Lee to do the same thing, but the gradient filters in colors seems quite unique. Is the set made by Lee as well?

    Ed

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