Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,867   Posts: 1,583,260   Online: 1156
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27
  1. #1
    David Ruby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Boise, Idaho
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    203
    Images
    6
    I messed something up on a close up shot of some leaves this fall. My 4 x 5 neg is so light I almost didn't think I had anything at all.

    So far, I've printed it with my grade 5 filter and I still can't seem to get much visual interest out of the pic. My guess is that If I could get more contrast there would be hope. Is there anything in the developing of the paper or some sort of toning that I might try?

    Due to the thin neg, there really isn't any seperation of tones. Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,485
    Images
    20
    My first guess: you probably forgot to calculate the bellows factor. I estimate or actually measure the magnification ratio by putting a ruler in the scene at the subject position and comparing it to the width of the groundglass, and then I have a little table on the back of each camera that gives me the exposure correction based on the magnification ratio and reminds me to include it.

    My second guess: you remembered the bellows factor and that put you into reciprocity territory, and you forgot to include the reciprocity factor. It's always something else, isn't it?

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    6,242
    Quote Originally Posted by David Ruby
    I messed something up on a close up shot of some leaves this fall. My 4 x 5 neg is so light I almost didn't think I had anything at all.

    So far, I've printed it with my grade 5 filter and I still can't seem to get much visual interest out of the pic. My guess is that If I could get more contrast there would be hope. Is there anything in the developing of the paper or some sort of toning that I might try?

    Due to the thin neg, there really isn't any seperation of tones. Thanks in advance.
    If you have selenium toner, you might try intensifying the negative with selenium toner mixed 1-3 with water. The selenium will be proportional to silver intensity on the negative (hightlights will tone while shadows will be less). If you have any density at all then selenium will add density and contrast to your negative.

  4. #4
    ann
    ann is offline

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,883
    Images
    26
    You could try selenium toning the negative. THis will add density, but NO DETAIL. Might help with the printing adds about 1 grade of contrast.

    Selenium 1:2 soak for about 5 minutes. Some people use water, others HCA.

    Ansel Adams in "THe Negative" recommends the following
    soak negative thoroughly in water the re-fix for several minutes in PLAIN hyo. Place in selenium diluted with HCA for about 5 minutes. Follow with a plain HCA and washing as usual. He also suggest that you test the procedure first with a discarded negative of the same emulsion.
    Steve Anchell suggest that if you are sure that your negatives have been thoroughly washed, and you have not used a fixer with a hardenerm then refixing should not be necessary. "But when in doubt, refix."

    Photography Formulary also carriers an intensifier, but I have not tried their version.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    southern california
    Posts
    11
    try the selenium but if you get virtually nothing from printing it now, you won't get much after you selenium tone it. There has to be enough silver for the selenium to work upon. Sounds like you have a very thin neg to start. Good luck. Better to just reshoot it.
    james

  6. #6
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,282
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    Selenium toning is also permanent, so you have no chance of using another intensifier. I would start with a bleach & redevelop in a staining developer; if that isn't enough I'd try a silver intensifier like IN-5 or something.

    I would never use selenium for intensification, since it is effectively one-way.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  7. #7
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,485
    Images
    20
    I use selenium intensification to pick up one extra zone of contrast--1+3 for 8 minutes, but just with negatives that have good detail to begin with. If the negative is very thin, then I agree that it would be better to chalk it up to experience and reshoot if possible.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  8. #8
    Loose Gravel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Santa Barbara, CA
    Posts
    921
    Images
    14
    Unless you think it is your 'moonrise', then take the time you'd spend goofing around with the neg and spend it behind the camera.

    If it is your moonrise, then besides intensifying, try digitizing and photoshop. (Whoops, sorry about those bad words.)
    Watch for Loose Gravel

  9. #9
    David Ruby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Boise, Idaho
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    203
    Images
    6
    Bellows Factor? Uh oh. I simply took a reading with my Luna Pro and set the camera to that? Am I missing something? This method worked just fine on some of the landscape shots form Oregon this summer?

    I can always re-shoot the scene next year when there are leaves again, but I thought it might be fun to learn some trick for that time when I cannot reshoot. Thanks all.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    6,242
    Bellows factor is a consideration when one focuses nearer then 8 times the focal length of the lens. (Some say 10 times). There are a number of different ways to measure the exposure adjustment for bellows factor consideration. The method that David mentioned is one of them. Another method is to measure the lens to film plane distance. In the case of a 210 mm lens for instance the infinity focus for a non telephoto lens is 8 1/4 inches. If I find that my distance is 11 inches I give one stop additional exposure. If I find that I am at a distance of 16 inches I give two stops additional exposure. If I were at 22 inches I would give three stops more exposure then the meter indicated. A good place to begin if you use this system is to type a F Stop chart as follows. 2.8, 3.5, 4.0*, 4.5, 5.0, 5.6*, 6.3, 7.1, 8.0*, 9, 10, 11*, 13, 14, 16*, 18, 20, 22*, 25, 28, 32*. The asterick stops are full stops the stops in between astericks are 1/3 stops.
    By converting your lenses to equivalent inch measurements you will then be able to measure lens to film plane distance and arrive at bellows extension exposure compensation very readily. As bellows length increases above infinity focus additional exposure must be given.

    Quite probably when you encounter a bellows extension situation you will also encounter reciprocity considerations. When the exposure exceeds one second reciprocity must be considered. Additional exposure must be given to adequately expose the film. When it exceed 5 seconds additional consideration must be given. As metered time increases above that additional time must be given. For instance I made an exposure the other day that the meter indicated 34 seconds exposure I gave 300 seconds to allow for reciprocity to properly expose the film. Most film manufacturers have reciprocity factors for their film. They may not be totally accurate under usage but they will be better then not factoring at all. This is due to the fact that film does not linearly expose when lengthy exposures are encountered. When we encounter reciprocity then development must be compensated by reducing development to reduce the contrast inherent in reciprocity situations. Hope that I haven't confused you but these are all considerations that you will encounter either in close up photography or in low light situations or combinations of these. Good luck

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin