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  1. #11
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fotch View Post
    You can use either wood or aluminum plates stacked, drilled in the four corners and drilled in the middle to extend the lens a couple of more inches. The machine shop probably could do it without to much expense. If you need a photo of something similar, I can send you one from a Durst enlarger that is mount like this.
    Thanks fotch.

    I had thought about rigging something like that, but as it was more of an interesting experiment than anything else, I haven't gone forward with anything.

    In addition, the Beseler 67 lensboards are very small (barely larger than the lens), so it might be quite finicky to do this.

    Matt

  2. #12
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    I took both my lenses off and had a look. They have the same threads, but the Beseler actually is held in with a threaded nut on the top side, rather than screwing straight in. Now I'm torn between which lens to keep, since the Beseler looks and feels much higher quality but the Rodenstock lens on the Omega has cool light-up F-numbers.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    Pretty much, yes. Most enlarging lenses made since the 1970s for 35mm and medium format use M39 (Leica thread mount). For bigger lenses starting around 135mm, you may need a larger lensboard hole, and some short lenses designed for formats like 110 may have had smaller mount sizes.
    Pretty much is correct, but you should be aware of some exceptions. The M39 thread is fairly standard, but there are other sizes out there. They require different lensboards. You also have to watch the back focus length (the distance between the back of the lens and the negative). Some enlargers will not focus using short focal length lenses like the 28mm Companon-S. Other enlargers do not have enough bellows draw to focus longer focal length lenses.

  4. #14
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    I took both my lenses off and had a look. They have the same threads, but the Beseler actually is held in with a threaded nut on the top side, rather than screwing straight in. Now I'm torn between which lens to keep, since the Beseler looks and feels much higher quality but the Rodenstock lens on the Omega has cool light-up F-numbers.
    Actually the lenses work the same way - it is the lensboards that are different (one has a threaded hole, while the other doesn't).

    I prefer the ones with the retaining ring (the "threaded nut") but that is probably just me.

    Tell us what the printing on each lens says and we will be happy to pass on our opinions .

    You need to be quite exact, because just a two letter difference in the lens name can be quite important.

    Matt

  5. #15
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    Well the one from the Omega says Rodenstock EL-OMEGAR 1:3,5 f=50mm LENS MADE IN GERMANY around the side.

    The one from the Printmaker 35 just says BESLAR 1:3.5 F=50mm JAPAN on the bottom and it only has the F-numbers on the side

    The Beslar one looks and feels higher quality being made out of wood, and the aperture blades are invisible wide open. The Rodenstock is all plasticky, and you can see aperture blades even wide open. It's cool how the f-numbers light up, but it seems to be foggy and have some bits of crud between the elements too.
    Last edited by BetterSense; 03-03-2009 at 06:04 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #16
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    Well the one from the Omega says Rodenstock EL-OMEGAR 1:3,5 f=50mm LENS MADE IN GERMANY around the side.

    The one from the Printmaker 35 just says BESLAR 1:3.5 F=50mm JAPAN on the bottom and it only has the F-numbers on the side
    These are both fairly basic quality lenses. If it were me, I would try them both out with a moderately large enlargement (you can print just a part of the image if you don't have or want to use large paper).

    The two prints will most likely be similar. If one appears sharper, or has better contrast, I'd choose that lens as my main "user" unless and until I got a better one.

    If the two prints are about the same, I'd go with the one you find easier to use. That may be the Rodenstock, because of the illuminated f/stops.

    Matt

    P.S. I'm assuming that you are intending to use these for Black & White. If you are also printing colour, you should do the same test with colour materials. Some lenses are better optimized for printing colour.

  7. #17
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    Yeah I'll keep my eye out for a better lens online, since I will need a 75mm anyway. I've made some prints with the Beslar lens and was pretty happy with them so I will keep that one and give the rodenstock away with my other enlarger.

  8. #18

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    The higher quality enlarging lenses for medium format in that range are all 80 mm. optics. Most of them will cover up to 6x7 cm. negatives, even if the makers don't specifically recommend them for that application. Rodenstock and Nikon do. Schneider does not, but it works. The 75 mm. optics don't cover 6x7 adequately and are generally of lesser quality. For modest enlargements, it is unlikely that you'll notice much of a difference. If you make really big prints, or crop a lot, the differences can be quite noticeable.
    Frank Schifano

  9. #19

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    El-Nikkor 75 is 4 element 80mm is 6. 80 is best buy.

  10. #20
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    I know this is an old thread, but would like to ask the forum a question.

    A friend kindly gave me a beautiful Nikor 150mm enlarging lens, and I'd like to use it to enlarge 5x5 negatives created using my 5x7 camera.

    The trick is that the lens has a thread that's larger than 39mm, and I haven't been able to find information on what the thread size might be.

    My questions are:
    1. What size thread might this lens be?
    2. Do I need to worry about my Omega D2/Pro-Lab4x5 and bellows draw being long enough?

    When I get home today I'll post a picture of the lens. Perhaps that will give more clues.

    Thankful for your help!
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

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