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  1. #11
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stradibarrius View Post
    As many of you realize I am a beginner at printing and up to this point expose, develop, stop and fix one print at a time, so that means that I am waiting about 8 mins in the dark shaking the fixer tray. If this is not necessary then I could turn the light on, reset my timers, blah, blah, blah.
    But if I need to sit and wait the whole time then that is what I will do...I guess I don't want to be like Bob Carnie and realize that I have spent most of my life waitng on the fixer!! LOL!!
    You could use a rapid fixer and be done with fixing in significantly less than 8 minutes. I like TF-4, which will also reduce your wash times.

    Half the fix time before turning on the white lights is a good rule of thumb, as suggested.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  2. #12
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stradibarrius View Post
    As many of you realize I am a beginner at printing and up to this point expose, develop, stop and fix one print at a time, so that means that I am waiting about 8 mins in the dark shaking the fixer tray. If this is not necessary then I could turn the light on, reset my timers, blah, blah, blah.
    But if I need to sit and wait the whole time then that is what I will do...I guess I don't want to be like Bob Carnie and realize that I have spent most of my life waitng on the fixer!! LOL!!
    Hang on! Why are you fixing that long? What materials are you using? The idea of print fixing is to fix strong and short, otherwise, you'll have trouble washing the residual fixer out of the paper. Please share your material combination.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  3. #13
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Two other points:

    1) this may be one of the advantages of using stop-bath as compared to a water rinse. If there is still some residual developer on the print, turning on the lights quickly may result in some minor fogging.
    2) I use those first few seconds in the fixer as a perfect time to glance around my darkroom to check whether I have, indeed, put away my photographic paper/closed my paper safe. IMHO, this is time well spent!

    Matt
    Last edited by MattKing; 03-05-2009 at 04:22 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #14

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    With film I just use a water rinse between dev and fix but with paper I always use a stop bath to preserve the fixer as I believe that there is more carry over with paper. I always wait for the complete fixing time before switching on the light because 1) what is the rush and 2) it gives you time to make sure everything is safe

  5. #15
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    Yes I have a safe light, but it is not like working with the light on.
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
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  6. #16
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    Doesn't it depend on the paper? I know many RC papers contain a developer in them and they turn purple if left in the sunlight undeveloped. Lots of paper does not like some RC and all (AFAIK) fiber paper. If it has developer I would wait longer, but if it's completely stopped it should be pretty light safe even before it goes into the fix.

  7. #17
    Maris's Avatar
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    I find that if my paper is fully "stopped" in fresh acid stop bath after development I can turn the lights on and move promptly to the rest of the procedure (fix, rinse, hypo-clear, archival wash, etc) and it makes no difference to the final result.

    I even do this with 8x10 sheet film in order to to freak out darkroom spectators who think seeing fully developed but unfixed film means disaster. The "freak-out" factor is compounded by me telling them in advance about the expense of sensitive materials and the dreadful consequences of mistakes.

    The underlying principle is probably that modern "developing out" emulsions deposit so little silver on exposure (compared to "printing out" emulsions) that I can't see it.
    Last edited by Maris; 03-05-2009 at 06:29 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: clarification
    Photography, the word itself, invented and defined by its author Sir John.F.W.Herschel, 14 March 1839 at the Royal Society, Somerset House, London. Quote "...Photography or the application of the Chemical rays of light to the purpose of pictorial representation,..". unquote.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    Hang on! Why are you fixing that long? What materials are you using? The idea of print fixing is to fix strong and short, otherwise, you'll have trouble washing the residual fixer out of the paper. Please share your material combination.
    Hi, Ralph and Stradibarrius,

    As a beginner (and a keen reader of your book "Beyong Monochrome"), I think I may have similar experience like stradibarrius. It is around 8 minutes each negative if I do it one by one.

    My short answer is do the wet cycle by batch. Longer answer is below:

    I do my 8x10 contact print and it takes hours to just finish the test print (for my 28 film batch each time). With limited time that can be spent on dark room, it is very hard to sustain.

    The breakthrough come when after I gain more confidence using Ralph procedure ( I hope I understand it correctly, plus reference to both Picker video via Ralph recommended foto.tv and further reading of Adam's book Appendix).

    I will now first fix the enlarger time with the black is really black in the paper (unexposed but developed negative print as black). If the actual negative is well exposed and developed (with 1.21 density range?), it can be just exposed and stockpiled in safe paper box before goes to the wet cycle. (If one want to adjust in the expose stage, one can try to do Dodge and Burn, ... etc. if one roughly know the effect. Or, simply just do a few varieties for really thick/thin negative.) Once I got the first set of print later, I can estimate what to do the next batch. Do not do wet cycle one negative each time.

    The key to me is to the wet cycle in batch. I can do 6 to 10 paper each 4 minute wet cycles and the result is similar to what I obtained in 1 paper each time. You just use the same technique as the tray development, only this time it is so much easier - you can do it with safe light on. The half to 1 minute (21 seconds enlargement light time) is fixed per negative but the batch wet cycle can cut the time nearly half. I contact print 70 outstanding negatives like this in < 2 hour after I found this procedure is ok. I can finally see the picture I have taken!

    Of course, when the good one comes, you can do it very carefully like not turn on safe light even, using fiber paper, detail dodge and burn etc.

    My two cents.

    Once again, Ralph it is a very good book.

    Dennis

  9. #19
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    Dektol developer, Kodak indicator stop bath, and Kodak professional fixer. Every where I read it says to fix 5-10 min. so I am fixing 7 min.
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
    Flicker http://www.flickr.com/photos/stradibarrius
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    Barry
    Monroe, GA

  10. #20

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    Sorry for the correction, but....
    Hi, Ralph and Stradibarrius,
    As a beginner (and a keen reader of your book "Beyong Monochrome")
    I think Ralph is the Author of "Way Beyond Monochrome"

    "Beyond Mononchrome" is a different book by Tony Worobiec.

    Maybe Ralph will appreciate the correction.

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