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  1. #31

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    It depends both on the fixer and your intended use of the print. If it is just a test print or test strip, 30 seconds in rapid fix or a minute in regular fix will clear the emulsion enough to make a good judgment. If it is a print you may want to keep, keep the white light off for at least half the recommended fixing time, preferably for the entire recommended time.

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by stradibarrius View Post
    When I take the B&W print out of the stop bath and place it into the fixer tray, how long does it have to be in the fixer before it is "light safe". Is it immediate or do I have to wait the entire time it is in the fixer?
    For test strips I usually turn the light on after 10 or 20 seconds. For real prints, half the total fixing time.

    The thing to remember is that paper is slow to discolor under normal light when there's no developer present, and stop bath kills the developer. So after a few seconds in the fixer you should have total development arrest and at least partial fixation anyway... so it's not a big deal to turn on the lights even just a few seconds after swirling around in the fixer a bit.. but for real prints, like I say, I wait until half the fixing time to be safe.

    I do film in drums so I don't open them up until the fixation is complete.
    The universe is a haunted house. -Coil
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  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    If you are using an alkaline or neutral fix and no stop. And if you use static water for the rinse after the developer and not running water, you can fog paper if you turn the lights on too soon. You see, developer gradually builds up in the static rinse and then is carried into the fix which then becomes a developer with a silver halide solvent in it, which assists in fogging the paper and developing it further. Light only adds to the injury.

    So, if you use an alkaline fix, make sure you use a stop or running water for a rinse.

    PE
    Forgive my ignorance, but what kinds of fixers are alkaline? I usually use Kodak fixer.

  4. #34
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    TF-3, TF-4, and then there are the nearly neutral ones.

    PE

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by walter23 View Post
    For test strips I usually turn the light on after 10 or 20 seconds. For real prints, half the total fixing time.

    The thing to remember is that paper is slow to discolor under normal light when there's no developer present, and stop bath kills the developer. So after a few seconds in the fixer you should have total development arrest and at least partial fixation anyway... so it's not a big deal to turn on the lights even just a few seconds after swirling around in the fixer a bit.. but for real prints, like I say, I wait until half the fixing time to be safe.

    I do film in drums so I don't open them up until the fixation is complete.
    True, but the undeveloped and unfixed emulsion leaves a slight veil on the print. After 20 seconds in rapid fix it is pretty well gone.

  6. #36

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    PE, doesn't stop kill TF4 due to the acidity?

  7. #37
    MFP
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    Uh Oh, I've always been told that on only needs to wait until it is stopped to turn the lights on..... oh.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by dfoo View Post
    PE, doesn't stop kill TF4 due to the acidity?
    No, it is buffered.

    PE

  9. #39

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    Warning: Hijack

    Not really on topic, but related:

    I stopped using alkaline fixers for film developing for exactly the reason PE describes. I found that even with a running water rinse, film developer would get carried over into the fix and cause streaking and fogging if the lights were turned on too early (I tray develop). PMK was a bigger problem than most in this respect. This got worse as a long developing session drew to an end and the fix became more contaminated and my concentration and carefulness fell off somewhat. Acid stop, acid fix, no problem.

    Nice to know, however, that alkaline fixers like TF-4 are buffered enough to be able to use an acid stop. Maybe I'll try it again for printing, since it is supposed to wash out easier (maybe someone could explain why that happens...).

    Best,

    Doremus Scudder
    www.DoremusScudder

  10. #40
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    Doremus, use that acid stop!

    PE

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