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  1. #21
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeroldharter View Post
    [*]Don't use kleenex, paper towels, toilet paper, or any other similar product in the darkroom.
    Jerold, you have found problems with paper towls giving you dust?

    Martin

  2. #22

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    Paper towels shed a dust like mad when you rub them on anything. The cheaper the paper towels the worse they are. Kleenexes are even worse as they seem to have a linty surface.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Aislabie View Post
    Jerold, you have found problems with paper towls giving you dust?

    Martin
    Just hold some paper towels up to sunlight or a lamp and pull two sheets apart. I have allergies so I pay attention to these things. But for allergies I will just sneeze. For darkroom work the results are worse. As noted, Kleenex is even worse. Blow your nose on a sunny day and you will see the dust bomb. The flour sack towels I mentioned are much better, cheap, and re-usable.
    Jerold Harter MD

  4. #24
    PhilipRingler's Avatar
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    best way to tame the dust in a darkroom is to mop the floor. The moisture helps limit the amount of dry dust that collects as well as the static electricity.

  5. #25
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeroldharter View Post
    Just hold some paper towels up to sunlight or a lamp and pull two sheets apart. I have allergies so I pay attention to these things. But for allergies I will just sneeze. For darkroom work the results are worse. As noted, Kleenex is even worse. Blow your nose on a sunny day and you will see the dust bomb. The flour sack towels I mentioned are much better, cheap, and re-usable.
    Thanks Jerold

    I'll change away from paper towels straight away

    Martin

  6. #26
    Chazzy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Aislabie View Post
    Thanks Jerold

    I'll change away from paper towels straight away

    Martin
    But don't forget the virtue that paper towels are disposable. If you wipe up a fixer spill, the fixer is gone and in the trash. If you use a cloth towel to mop up the spill and attempt to re-use it later, even if it has dried, you run the risk of spreading fixer dust and contaminating your hands. I'd prefer for spilled solutions to get wiped up with paper towels and thrown into the garbage. Ditto with drying hands which have gotten into the fixer, if that occurs.
    Charles Hohenstein

  7. #27
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    I used a carpeted walk-in closet for my darkroom. I keep the door mostly shut all the time; I'd rather it wasn't carpeted but I can dry film in there with no problems. At walmart I saw several small room-sized HEPA filtration units for sale in the $60-$100 range. If it was in the budget I would buy one of those and leave it running in the darkroom all the time.

  8. #28
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chazzy View Post
    But don't forget the virtue that paper towels are disposable. If you wipe up a fixer spill, the fixer is gone and in the trash. If you use a cloth towel to mop up the spill and attempt to re-use it later, even if it has dried, you run the risk of spreading fixer dust and contaminating your hands. I'd prefer for spilled solutions to get wiped up with paper towels and thrown into the garbage. Ditto with drying hands which have gotten into the fixer, if that occurs.
    Chazzy, you are right of course

    Paper towels still have a place in the darkroom, for quickly mopping up spills and then you just bin them

    However, Jerolds’ point about using paper towels as dusters is very true, I tried it on a dark shiny work surface and surprised myself just how much stuff the paper towel shed as it collected up other debris :o

    As for fingers in the fixer - I have to wash my hands very carefully if I ever do accidentally get fixer on my skin, as otherwise it leaches out onto subsequent prints, leaving inverse fingerprints in the shadow areas

    Martin

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chazzy View Post
    But don't forget the virtue that paper towels are disposable. If you wipe up a fixer spill, the fixer is gone and in the trash. If you use a cloth towel to mop up the spill and attempt to re-use it later, even if it has dried, you run the risk of spreading fixer dust and contaminating your hands. I'd prefer for spilled solutions to get wiped up with paper towels and thrown into the garbage. Ditto with drying hands which have gotten into the fixer, if that occurs.
    Charles,

    I use single tray processing and I must say I have never had a fixer spill. I use latex gloves if I process a batch of prints by interleaving them but my bare hands never touch the chemistry. I don't like paper towels at all in the darkroom but I think that the less "fuzzy" the surface the better if you use them.

    I use these flour sack towels. They are cheap. You can buy a dozen or two. I go through many towels in a darkroom session and then wash them.

    http://www.americanchairstore.com/floursacktowels.html
    Jerold Harter MD

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