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Thread: Blue RA4 prints

  1. #11
    rossawilson1's Avatar
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    Apologies Photo engineer is obviously correct, SUBTRACT yellow don't add.

  2. #12
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    Doh! Just went up to check (luckily I didn't reset the colour head) and its set on Y and M only, C is 0 indeed. One is 55 the other 65 - not sure which is which anymore. I seem to have read somewhere (but not tested as I didn't get past the blue stage) you're only supposed to dial in two filters, not all three? Not sure there's aperture bypass on the lens, so don't think I engaged that...

    The new developer was the first thing I tried, combined with an intense wash of all materials involved, so no luck there either...

    The aperture was at f/5.8, paper size 5x7 but I'll give it another go at f/11.

    I'll keep you all posted - and thanks again for the generous input!

    Zeno
    Last edited by ZZZeDDD; 03-31-2009 at 03:23 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: some extra info I forgot

  3. #13
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    I've also found that a stop bath was, if not necessary in RA-4 printing, is at least highly advisable for the protection of one's sanity. I use 1% acetic acid (one part white vinegar to 4 parts water).

    The overall color in the final print will depend, directly, on the color balance of the negative, and, generally overlooked, the color temperature of the enlarger or other light system. As an example, there is a world of difference between a "PH" (?? memory suspect) incandescent lamp and an EYA Halogen.

    What filtration were you using?
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  4. #14
    rossawilson1's Avatar
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    Indeed, if using M and Y then adding C will only serve as neutral density and cut out light without changing the colour. Although you could argue cutting the amount of light will induce a slight colour shift.

    Hope it goes well!

  5. #15

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    These exposures at f5.6 are way over what I ever needed with a Durst M605. I usually needed under 10 secs and at f11 and with only a 75W bulb. Do you mean there isn't even the slightest hint of a picture? You have put the paper the right way up have you and aren't exposing the non emulsion side?

    How did you arrive at these exposures?

    I'd make sure that the paper is emulsion side up, use PE's recommendations on initial filtration, try several strips at 5 intervals, starting at 4 secs to 20 secs and with an aperture of f11. Use only Y and M as per Kodak's recommendation and set C to zero.

    If the chems are fresh and at the correct operating temp and you still get nothing with the above settings then I am stumped.

    pentaxuser

  6. #16
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    With a 5x7 from a 35mm, I would use f11 or f16 based on what I hear, and I would work from there.

    It may be that you need to go to about 10M and 10Y to beat the blues. In that case, you might need f16 or f22.

    PE

  7. #17

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    Others' suggestions are good. I'll add this: If there's any image on the print at all (vs. a solid blue), you could try scanning it and post the image for us to see. Be sure that the scan is a reasonable approximation of the print in overall color, though. I suggest this because something about the print that you haven't mentioned might be critically important.

    I'll also hammer, probably needlessly, on one point: A red safelight will cause cyan fogging. This is at any point between opening the box of paper and its development. So if you're processing in open trays, be sure to do so in total darkness until the paper is in the blix. If you're using a drum or similar enclosed processing hardware, you can turn on the lights after the paper is in the drum and you've put its lid on.

  8. #18
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    I get weird dark blue results when my paper is way overexposed, like when I forget to stop down the enlarger after focusing.

    With Kodak paper I find myself in the 60-70 range with the M and Y dials. The fuji paper requires much less filtration. That's with my enlarger though.

  9. #19

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    Exhausted or contaminated developer will "tinge" prints a blue color - but you'd normally get some image with it. Are you sure the safelights were off? Because all blue sounds like fogging with yellow, (or amber) light.

    Bob H
    "Why is there always a better way?"

  10. #20

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    I use a Beseler 23C with a dichro head. Colour paper is a LOT faster than black and white paper, and an over-exposed colour print from a negative will come out dark blue all over. For example, when printing 35mm to 8X10, I expose b&w paper for about 15 sec at f11. Supra Endura I expose at f11 for 3 seconds. Do a test strip at 1,2,4,and 8 seconds and see what you get. My guess is you will probably get an image at 2 sec. I started doing colour about a year ago. It took me about two boxes of paper until I figured out the subtractive colour balance thingy so my prints are consistently correctly colour balanced. Just the other night, I ran off eight colour 8X10s and only had to re-do one of them to adjust the colour balance. They were all printed from 6X6 negs from the same type of film. When you change film, you usually have to re-balance the colour filters.

    Incidently, colour analysers are available quite cheap on ebay right now. I bought one for less than $20. It helps you get in the ball park when you change film types or formats. There are instructions on the net regarding how to use one.

    Have fun.

    Rick
    Rick Jason.
    "I'm still developing"

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