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  1. #1
    tequilabong's Avatar
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    HELP!! What is the opposite of spotting?

    Well, I had some critters on my film when exposing....By critters, I mean dust, etc.....

    What is the best way to remove the black little specs from a fiber print? I remember with RC you can use bleach, but I remember that does not work with fiber.....

    I have my first show on Friday and I need to clean up a few prints.

    I think one can take an Exacto knife and actually remove part of the emulsion?? Is that a proper way to acheive this??

    Or, is anything available that is like the opposite of spotpens>

    Thanks.

    Gordo

  2. #2
    ann
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    you can take some tinture of iodine from the drugstore, a tooth pick and care, remove black specs. you have to re-fix then spot.

    they do make or did make a set of pens that was suppose to do that very thing, but we had a set at school and found them useless.
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

  3. #3
    Monophoto's Avatar
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    Well, its easier to deal with white spots than with black spots, but there are some options -

    1. Knifing is the Limey term for etching away black spots with an Xacto knife or scalpel. It does work, but it leaves a defect in the surface of the print. If you use a textured surface paper, the defect is less obvious. Another solution is to either wax or varnish the print after it is finished. Both are practices that are not widely done any more, and finding both the materials and someone to teach you how to do it without ruining good prints would be a challenge.

    2. You can also bleach the spots, and then spot them back to match the surrounding area. That's also a both tedious and dodgey. I've used toothpicks that I've sharpened with sandpaper to a very fine point, and then soaked in ferricyanide to bleach small black spots with some limited success.

    3. Black spots on the print are caused by clear spots in the negative. If you are working with larger negatives, a very good option is to carefully apply a tiny spot of dye to the non-emulsion side of the negative over the white spots. Then, when you print, they will no longer be white. I use Dr. Martin's magenta liquid water color dyes for this much like spotting dyes would be used on a print - the fact that it's magenta means that it acts like a high-value multigrade printing filter and increases local contrast at the point where the dye is applied - that helps make the effect on the print less obvious. It's hard (actually, impossible) to get exactly the right dye density, so it's likely that you will end up having to spot the print a bit to compensate for too much dye on the negative.

    4. Finally, another solution is to print down the area where the black spots are located so that they aren't as obtrusive. That doesn't make them go away - they are just less obvious when they are in a darker field than when they are in a lighter field. Of course, Murphy's Law says that they will be in the sky where you are going to want to maintain gentle separation of the high values - which means that you are back to one of the other three solutions.
    Louie

  4. #4
    Don12x20's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tequilabong View Post
    Well, I had some critters on my film when exposing....By critters, I mean dust, etc.....

    What is the best way to remove the black little specs from a fiber print? I remember with RC you can use bleach, but I remember that does not work with fiber.....

    I have my first show on Friday and I need to clean up a few prints.

    I think one can take an Exacto knife and actually remove part of the emulsion?? Is that a proper way to acheive this??

    Or, is anything available that is like the opposite of spotpens>

    Thanks.

    Gordo
    Best way is to add density to the negative so that the black spots don't occur.

    But you have prints - and you need a (presume you are working in silver) silver reducer.

    Get hold of some potassium ferricyanide, a fine point brush and some non-rapid non-hardening fixer. apply the ferricyanide sparingly and dip back into fixer. You'll eventually make white spots, which can be retouched.

    Yes, with an exacto knife, you could thin the black spot to match the surrounding denisty...but you'll leave some obvious holes in the emulastion surface. Looks bad...

    Oh, Potassium ferricyanide used to be sold in small amounts by Kodak under the "Farmers Reducer" label.

  5. #5
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Good comments, but careful, potassium ferricyanide and Farmers Reducer are not the same. Farmers already contains fixer. I find it easier to use ferri and fix, ferri and fix, ferri and fix... However, I have never tried to remove black spots with ferri. It seems to me that this might take a lot of patience to work. The simplest way is to add density to the negative as mentioned by Monophoto and Don. There was a product called 'Perfect Opaque', which is ideal for this, but regular spotting dyes applied to the negative will work as well. You could even apply drafting ink to to the negative (not the emulsion side, please).
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  6. #6
    kompressor's Avatar
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    The FR from Kodak i have is a two solution stock after mixing. I use Part A on prints to bleach, thats Ferrocyanid. When bleaching larger areas og negatives i use it mixed as told by Kodak on the label. B&H sells FR

  7. #7
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kompressor View Post
    The FR from Kodak i have is a two solution stock after mixing. I use Part A on prints to bleach, thats Ferrocyanid. When bleaching larger areas og negatives i use it mixed as told by Kodak on the label. B&H sells FR
    Potassium ferricyanide must never be used alone! One must refix the print after using it, otherwise the silver left in the emulsion, which will eventually ruin the print.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

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    Kodak sold a product called "Opaque (black)". I picked up a bottle couple years ago at a now defuct camera store; but haven't tried it yet. Have tried a pencil with an Adams Machine, but only marginal success.
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  9. #9
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    IMO, spotting the negatives to raise density, then spotting the resulting light area on the print is the much less "hairy" approach. It is slow, but very safe. It worked very well the times I have done it. It is time consuming and tedious, but worth it, with etching or digitization being the ugly alternatives. I have used both spot tone and soft graphite taken from an artist's pencil, applied with rounded-over toothpicks of various thicknesses. Spot tone is easier to be precise with, but graphite blends better. I used both together and got better results than I expected...that's for sure. Don't be discouraged by an ugly looking negative. The goal is not to make the neg look perfect, but to make it into a negative that creates a print that can be repaired.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 05-14-2009 at 04:47 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  10. #10
    Stephen Frizza's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tequilabong View Post

    What is the best way to remove the black little specs from a fiber print? I remember with RC you can use bleach, but I remember that does not work with fiber.....

    Gordo
    You certainly can bleach a fiber base print, and solve this problem with bleach.
    you just have to make sure that you don't use harder in the fix before bleaching. I often bleach these black flecks for people in my lab.

    a second option is using a small amount of photographers opaque or Indian Ink
    on the negative where the small spot is. this then renders the spot white and is easier to spot if you don't want the hassle of bleaching.
    "Its my profession to hijack time" ~ Stephen Frizza.

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