Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,964   Posts: 1,523,315   Online: 1201
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Norway
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    29
    Images
    15
    Which one of the labels is the old creamy one? J-fr, is it the upper or the lower one in your enclosed picture?
    Bernt

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Copenhagen
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    81
    Images
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by bernt View Post
    Which one of the labels is the old creamy one? J-fr, is it the upper or the lower one in your enclosed picture?
    Bernt
    It is the lower one.

    j-fr

    www.j-fr.dk

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    923
    Quote Originally Posted by dpurdy View Post
    It is very easy to turn the bright white paper into a warm creamy color. Just a quick bath in black tea will do it. The new formulation Oriental WT is interesting because though it has a much creamier warmer base on the emulsion side, it is just as bright white on the back paper side. The warmer creamier color must come from coloring the clay or something. PE suggested that.
    Dennis
    I prefer dilute green tea personally. Very close to the original warm base
    Mark
    Mark Layne
    Nova Scotia
    and Barbados

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma, USA
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    680
    If I understand this thread Ilford WT fiber recently changed paper tint to a white base vs the slight creme!! Thats great if true. The Oriental WT I took delivery on in 2007/mid 2008 had a white base. The new Oriental, made by Ilford, is way different. Yellow and slow. A white paper base increases print brilliance. Berrger WT, made by Ilford, also has a white base. With the old Oriental and now Berrger one can cool the image in selenium and achieve plummy shadows and oyster high tones.
    RJ

  5. #15
    dpurdy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Portland OR USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,039
    Images
    38
    I believe the paper base change in Ilford was a few years ago, maybe 3 or 4 if my memory is right. But is it true that Oriental WT is now made by*Ilford?

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma, USA
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    680
    I got a hint from a major retailer. Their excellent product reps know their products. They got blind sided by the Oriental WT emulsion change in 2008. I returned 8 packages for a more neutral paper. The older Oriental WT was an exceptable replacement for Forte Polywarmtone Plus. The new Oriental WT is very slow and very warm/yellow.
    RJ

  7. #17
    Chazzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    South Bend, IN, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,840
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Jepsen View Post
    I got a hint from a major retailer. Their excellent product reps know their products. They got blind sided by the Oriental WT emulsion change in 2008. I returned 8 packages for a more neutral paper. The older Oriental WT was an exceptable replacement for Forte Polywarmtone Plus. The new Oriental WT is very slow and very warm/yellow.
    In that case, it might be just the thing I want.
    Charles Hohenstein

  8. #18
    dpurdy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Portland OR USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,039
    Images
    38
    In 2008 when I tested them side by side I thought that they seemed like the same paper and they were both on a brighter white than I like. Now however recently Oriental has a new Warmer Formulation that is much warmer and is warmer than Ilford was 5 years ago. The new Oriental, which I think changed only a couple months ago, is half the speed of the previous Oriental WT.

  9. #19
    Bob F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    London
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,984
    Images
    19
    A good way to warm up a white base colour is to sepia tone with a short diluted bleach stage - just enough bleaching to effect the highlights. Of course, that's brown rather than cream, but the effect can be useful if you want to knock the bright white off a little.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    7
    I have not used the new version of ILMGIVFB warmtone yet but suspect that it is about 1 stop slower than the old one. I recently updated the software on my Heiland splitgrade module. The upgrade includes new settings to accommodate changes in this paper. I did not realise how drastic the changes were until I made my first print on paper with the 'old' label. It seemed to require a very long exposure time, but went ahead and printed it anyway. The print was way too dark. Reducing exposure by 1 stop produced a reasonable print with nice contrast, but I have not had time to evaluate it fully. BTW all the MGIVWT paper in my possession still has the old label.

    I would be interested to hear whether others have had similar experiences.

    In my view the old version of this paper is brilliant, and sincerely hope this also applies to the new one.

    LG

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin