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  1. #11
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    Well that's roughly what I do. The problem is certain highlights cannot be printed because they are very dense on the negative. If I attempt to expose for them, the rest of the print (skintones and midtones) just gets darker.

    The root of my question is whether I can get rid of these burnt highlights by developing less, or if I just have to deal with them because I'm pushing my negatives. I don't know if my developing is typical because there is little data available for D-23; I basically just added 50% to my usual time.
    In that case, I would try to find the highlights you can print with, and burn in all denser highlights after the shadows are adjusted. To answer your main question, reducing development will tame excessive highlights, but isn't it too late for that?
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  2. #12
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    In that case, I would try to find the highlights you can print with, and burn in all denser highlights after the shadows are adjusted. To answer your main question, reducing development will tame excessive highlights, but isn't it too late for that?
    *******
    What about Farmer's Reducer?
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  3. #13
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anscojohn View Post
    *******
    What about Farmer's Reducer?
    John

    Stay clear of that! Farmer's has faint shadow density for lunch and is absolutely scared of dense highlights. That will only increase negative contrast and make these negs even harder to print.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  4. #14
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    John

    Stay clear of that! Farmer's has faint shadow density for lunch and is absolutely scared of dense highlights. That will only increase negative contrast and make these negs even harder to print.
    *******
    Glad I asked.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  5. #15
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    To answer your main question, reducing development will tame excessive highlights, but isn't it too late for that?
    Of course. I think the "print for the most-printable highlights and burn down the glary spots" approach works pretty well. But in the future I can change development; I have a roll right here actually that I'm still not sure if I should cut my time back with. Theoretically I can cut development 10% and shadow detail will not be effected, but if that's the case then why do people develop longer when pushing film in the first place?
    f/22 and be there.

  6. #16
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    Theoretically I can cut development 10% and shadow detail will not be effected, but if that's the case then why do people develop longer when pushing film in the first place?
    Because, development does affect shadows as well, but to a much lesser degree than highlights.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  7. #17
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    Of course. I think the "print for the most-printable highlights and burn down the glary spots" approach works pretty well. But in the future I can change development; I have a roll right here actually that I'm still not sure if I should cut my time back with. Theoretically I can cut development 10% and shadow detail will not be effected, but if that's the case then why do people develop longer when pushing film in the first place?
    *******
    Maybe some of the experts could give some info on Adams's water bath technique with D23. That might support your low and mid-tones with less blocking of the highlights.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  8. #18
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    Well, looking at this thread are ways of printing I never imagined... In my limited experience, I usually just print the negatives like normal, and love the result. Pushing film does in fact give more contrast, more grain, and also increased acutance.
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    Well that's roughly what I do. The problem is certain highlights cannot be printed because they are very dense on the negative. If I attempt to expose for them, the rest of the print (skintones and midtones) just gets darker.

    The root of my question is whether I can get rid of these burnt highlights by developing less, or if I just have to deal with them because I'm pushing my negatives. I don't know if my developing is typical because there is little data available for D-23; I basically just added 50% to my usual time.
    how about
    printing a test of the blocked highlights
    and a test for the easy highlights
    and basically print the blocked ones
    while dodging out the rest of the print.
    and then "adjust" the murky dodged out part
    by burning in with a filter ...
    i have a feeling my explanation doesn't make much sense ..
    but just the same sometimes this sort of thing works ..
    and sometimes it doesn't ..

    good luck!
    john

  10. #20
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    how about
    printing a test of the blocked highlights
    and a test for the easy highlights
    and basically print the blocked ones
    while dodging out the rest of the print.
    and then "adjust" the murky dodged out part
    by burning in with a filter ...
    i have a feeling my explanation doesn't make much sense ..
    but just the same sometimes this sort of thing works ..
    and sometimes it doesn't ..

    good luck!
    john

    I like it, but here is a slight modification:

    Print a test of the blocked highlights
    and a test for the easy highlights.
    Then print the easy ones
    and burn the blocked highlights.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

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