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  1. #11
    paul_c5x4's Avatar
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    I cheat - I have a (very) dim amber LED illuminating the dial on my stopclock at arm length from the trays. After exposing the paper, drop it in to the dev, hit the timer button. 60Sec later, in to the stop for 15Sec, then blix for 60Sec. This is in the Tetenal room temperature kit running at 20°C. If you get one of these kits, instructions are included for running a replenishment line in a Nova slot processor.

  2. #12
    eli griggs's Avatar
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    If you really can't learn to work with the easel as is, get an easel sized cutoff of 3cm granite from a stone-yard that does countertops, surfaced both sides, and use double-sided tape on the feet of the easel to fix it to the slab. The smooth surface of the stone will slide on the baseboard easily enough but the weight will keep it in place while printing.

    Add additional support under the baseboard so it doesn't warp under the weight and use dots of luminous tape, punched out with a paper punch or hand cut, to mark the ends of the blades of the easel so you know where things are in the dark. They won't fog your material and bits of glow-in-the-dark tape are generally helpful in a blacked-out darkroom.

    Eli

  3. #13
    thefizz's Avatar
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    Get yourself one of these (colour version). They are very handy.

    http://www.rhdesigns.co.uk/darkroom/html/safetorch.html
    www.thephotoshop.ie
    www.monochromemeath.com

    "you get your mouth off of my finger" Les McLean

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by thefizz View Post
    Get yourself one of these (colour version). They are very handy.

    http://www.rhdesigns.co.uk/darkroom/html/safetorch.html
    This looks ideal.

  5. #15

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    A couple more comments:

    • I suggest you test the light from your timer. It might not be a problem. In any event, putting it in a changing bag is probably overkill. A simple barrier, like a 3-ring binder propped open next to the timer, will probably be more than sufficient even if the timer's light causes problems when it's unshielded.
    • For development in the dark, I use an electronic kitchen timer that beeps. (I use the same timer for developing B&W paper and for film, too.) It's easy enough to start it running in the dark, since the buttons on the model I've got are easy to locate and distinguish by feel.

  6. #16

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    Perkeleellinen, my LPL easel has rubber tips below that prevent it from slipping. You might be able to find something similar. I just set the blades, align it to the projected image and that's it.

  7. #17

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    Lots of timers have a beeper or buzzer at the end of the timing period, even 40 year old Gralabs.

  8. #18

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    Also, if your easel is not new, the rubber feet probably have hardened and will slip easily.

  9. #19

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    Thanks again for the tips. Recently I'd been using a little Paterson 5x7 fixed format easel which is very light and plastic. I also have a much larger LPL easel that is metal with rubber feet. That may be fine - I'll have to go and check later today.

    I'm happy to hear that small amounts of light from timers etc may not fog the paper. I was under the impression that 100% darkness was necessary. Having just the faintest glow of light may help with orientation also.

  10. #20

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    I did get a little bit of fogging from the red LED display on my Spiratone Darkroom Director when I did color printing. I taped a few layers of unexposed color negative film over the display to dim it, and that worked pretty well. Another tip: put small pieces of glow-in-the-dark tape at strategic places to help you orient yourself in the darkness.

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