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  1. #1

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    Expose to develop delay time

    Just got a cheap enlarger ($35 with 3 lenses) - cannot resist even tough I don't have any space to set as darkroom.

    For a couple of days, I did my own BW printing. My enlarging (dry) and developing (wet) space is separated. So, what I do is - expose a paper, put it into dev tank and after I was done with it, I went to my bathroom in second floor to develop it. Time delay for the paper about 15 to 30 minutes. So far, I can manage a "so-so" prints (yeah, it's from 35mm to post-card size...).

    Well, is there any rule about delaying paper development? Is my workflow will make any effect rather than directly develop after exposing?

    Thank you.
    Last edited by jongcelebes; 08-31-2009 at 08:51 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jongcelebes View Post
    For a couple of days, I did my own BW printing. My enlarging (dry) and developing (wet) space is separated. So, what I do is - expose a paper, put it into dev tank and after I was done with it, I went to my bathroom in second floor to develop it. Time delay for the paper about 15 to 30 minutes. So far, I can manage a "so-so" prints (yeah, it's from 35mm to post-card size...).

    Well, is there any rule about delaying paper development? Is my workflow will make any effect rather than directly develop after exposing?

    Thank you.
    Given time, the latent image will weaken, and there will be less image to be developed. The critical time depends on your materials, but consistency is the key. As long as the time from exposure to development is consistent, your workflow is consistent. I suggest to make several identical exposures on one piece of paper with doubling time delays, which are are close to your working procedures (maybe 2, 4, 8, 16, 32 minutes). Then take them up and develop them to see what difference the time delays made.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  3. #3
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jongcelebes View Post
    Well, is there any rule about delaying paper development?
    There isn't any, as far as I know. It was common for package printers - high school yearbook photographs, for instance - to make a few hundred prints on a roll of paper that is run through a processing machine several hours later.

    Film exposures on slow B&W film have a latency period measured in years. I imagine the same would be true of paper - however you should probably keep the paper tightly wrapped and minimize air exposure if you are going to delay processing much past a day or so.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  4. #4
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Lindan View Post
    There isn't any, as far as I know. It was common for package printers - high school yearbook photographs, for instance - to make a few hundred prints on a roll of paper that is run through a processing machine several hours later.

    Film exposures on slow B&W film have a latency period measured in years. I imagine the same would be true of paper - however you should probably keep the paper tightly wrapped and minimize air exposure if you are going to delay processing much past a day or so.
    The latent image stability with film is amazing. Paper does not have the same stability. I don't know how long it will last, but the difference in speed and contrast between a 0 and 32 minutes delay can be seen in a side-by-side comparison.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails LatentImage.jpg  
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  5. #5
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    The latent image stability with film is amazing. Paper does not have the same stability...
    That's an eye-opener. Seems like 3-4 minutes would be a maximum time - very interesting.

    Retract my post above ...
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
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  6. #6
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    The latent image stability with film is amazing. Paper does not have the same stability. I don't know how long it will last, but the difference in speed and contrast between a 0 and 32 minutes delay can be seen in a side-by-side comparison.
    Ralph, are you going to share all this wonderful info with us in the new book?

    Please

    Martin

  7. #7
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Aislabie View Post
    Ralph, are you going to share all this wonderful info with us in the new book?

    Please

    Martin
    Only if you say 'please'.

    Of course I will. The book will be ready for the printer in three months.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  8. #8
    jeroldharter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    The latent image stability with film is amazing. Paper does not have the same stability. I don't know how long it will last, but the difference in speed and contrast between a 0 and 32 minutes delay can be seen in a side-by-side comparison.
    I can only state my experience with Kentmere FP VC and Kodak Polymax papers. When doing a project, I often expose final prints in series of 5-10 and store the exposed paper in a paper safe. I sometimes have 30-50 sheets of final prints to develop. As luck would have it, sometimes I have had to wait a week or even two weeks before I could get back in the darkroom to process the prints. I could discern no difference to my eye.

    What type of paper shows such a speed loss in just 32 minutes?
    Jerold Harter MD

  9. #9
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeroldharter View Post
    I can only state my experience with Kentmere FP VC and Kodak Polymax papers. When doing a project, I often expose final prints in series of 5-10 and store the exposed paper in a paper safe. I sometimes have 30-50 sheets of final prints to develop. As luck would have it, sometimes I have had to wait a week or even two weeks before I could get back in the darkroom to process the prints. I could discern no difference to my eye.

    What type of paper shows such a speed loss in just 32 minutes?
    Jerold

    This test was conducted in April of 2003 with Ilford Multigrade-IV FB for latent image times from 8 seconds to 4 hours. The speed loss was 0.05 log exposure after 32 minutes in Zone VIII density (0.09 absolue reflection density), which is roughly 1/6 f/stop of exposure. I'm certain one would not see that unless a side-by-side comparison is made.

    Latent image stability is related to reciprocity failure, and hence, most obvious in print highlights (where it was measured). It will be different with different papers and possibly different developers, but I see no reason to expect drastic differences.

    Some darkroom workers have reported that they saw a difference between test-strip densities and final print. I suspect that most of these reports are caused by latent image stability or the lack thereof, if a number of test strips were made in sequence but developed simultaneously.

    To be certain, I suggest to conduct this test for ones own materials, but it is advisable to keep the time between exposure and development constant in order to ensure consistent results.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  10. #10
    jeroldharter's Avatar
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    Thanks Ralph. I too will be buying your book!
    Jerold Harter MD

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