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  1. #1
    clayne's Avatar
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    Stupid Question: Can Prints Be Dried in Trays?

    I haven't set up any kind of screens and I usually just hang the fiber prints in my drying cabinet. However, I'm getting tired of the clothespin marring. Flatness isn't a big problem, though. Is it possible to dry prints in dry clean trays? The reason I ask is that it's pretty easy for me to fit these in the cabinet and avoid dust while allowing a slow dry - but I'd like to avoid prints sticking to plastic, etc.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  2. #2
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    NO

    They stick to the tray. Make some drying screens.

    Ian

  3. #3
    clayne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    NO

    They stick to the tray. Make some drying screens.

    Ian
    Thanks! Glad I didn't waste any. :-)
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  4. #4
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    Thanks! Glad I didn't waste any. :-)
    And waste you would, they are real pigs to remove once stuck

    Ian

  5. #5
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    I haven't set up any kind of screens and I usually just hang the fiber prints in my drying cabinet. However, I'm getting tired of the clothespin marring. Flatness isn't a big problem, though. Is it possible to dry prints in dry clean trays? The reason I ask is that it's pretty easy for me to fit these in the cabinet and avoid dust while allowing a slow dry - but I'd like to avoid prints sticking to plastic, etc.
    You can dry prints in trays, but then you have to either mat and frame the tray or use a putty knife to get the print out, which makes the hanging mark thing seem pretty inconsequential. I have dried prints on cardboard (the box kind) with very good results.

  6. #6

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    The Sticky - Getting Fiber Base Paper Flat at ....

    Read there my and other's posts on the
    subject. I use the corrugated board method
    and employ not absorbent blotter separators
    but a polyester sheeting which is hydrophobic.
    In effect it is water proof.

    The board and sheeting cost nearly nothing.
    A stack when built weighs very few pounds.
    Easy to stow out of the way. When in use it
    must be weighted on top.

    If done correctly, Dry and Flat in one move.
    A slow gentile dry. Dan

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    ........A slow gentile dry. Dan
    As opposed to a Jewish dry? Sorry someone had to - and, of course it would be me !!

    Bob H
    "Why is there always a better way?"

  8. #8

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    The Sticky - Getting Fiber Base Paper Flat at ....

    ... B&W film, paper, chemistry

    Read there my and other's posts on the
    subject. I use the corrugated board method
    and employ not blotters but non absorbent
    separators of polyester sheeting.

    The board and sheeting cost nearly nothing.
    A stack when built weighs very few pounds.
    Easy to stow out of the way. When in use
    it must be weighted on top.

    If done correctly, Dry and Flat in one move.
    A slow gentile dry. Dan

  9. #9
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=dancqu;860045... I use the corrugated board method
    and employ not blotters but non absorbent
    separators of polyester sheeting.[/QUOTE]

    This sounds interesting. I have one of the "blotter books" that, in my mind, was a waste fo money. Looked like it would work, but isn't as effective as I expected.

    What kind of sheeting do you use? Would wax paper work just as well?
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelbsc View Post
    This sounds interesting. I have one of the "blotter books" that,
    in my mind, was a waste fo money. Looked like it would work,
    but isn't as effective as I expected.

    What kind of sheeting do you use?
    The corrugated board stack dryer builds with board on bottom
    then separator, print, separator, print, separator, and last
    a board. The separator material I've found to work well
    is Pellon 70; a hydrophobic non-woven polyester.
    Available at fabric shop as interfacing.

    So, some corrugated board, $3.00 of interfacing and you've
    all thats needed for dry and flat in one move. Allow for
    several days to dry. A slow, gentile dry. Dan

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