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  1. #11

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    5 is not very much grey, and would be pretty harsh for most normal contrast negs. If you want just black and white, you could you could use a lith developer at it's normal strength.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveOttawa View Post
    Why stop at 10, why not go to 11
    My amp goes to 11, but I also have problems with my drummer spontaneously combusting, so it's a trade off...

    I fully agree with Dave. If you feel you need still more with a #5 (which should yield soot and chalk prints) then you need to adjust your exposure/development to produce more contrast...

    - Randy

  3. #13
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    My Beseler 23 C II Has the makings on the main support columns but they serve no useful purpose (to me anyways) but the markings on the head, well you know what it says.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by reellis67 View Post
    My amp goes to 11, but I also have problems with my drummer spontaneously combusting, so it's a trade off...
    Spinal Tap eh?

    Quote Originally Posted by reellis67 View Post
    I fully agree with Dave. If you feel you need still more with a #5 (which should yield soot and chalk prints) then you need to adjust your exposure/development to produce more contrast...

    - Randy
    Proper exposure/development is the obvious choice, but wouldn't stronger paper developer give a bit more contrast?

    EDIT: Or maybe print at #5, contact print that one on another piece of paper and contact print once more to get another positive?

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by reellis67 View Post
    My amp goes to 11, but I also have problems with my drummer spontaneously combusting, so it's a trade off...

    I fully agree with Dave. If you feel you need still more with a #5 (which should yield soot and chalk prints) then you need to adjust your exposure/development to produce more contrast...

    - Randy
    He was killed in a bizarre gardening accident.

    The police said best to leave it unsolved.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whiteymorange View Post
    If the object is simply to see what's on the roll, what's the point of adding filtration?
    In that case, what is the point of making a contact sheet? Just look at the negative

  7. #17
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    [QUOTE=Anon Ymous;867572]Proper exposure/development is the obvious choice, but wouldn't stronger paper developer give a bit more contrast?
    QUOTE]

    I doubt if changing paper dev concentration would have much effect, ceratinly the Ilford data sheet doesn't suggest that it would. In any case it is likely to be very small, less than 1/2 grade. Contrast is the range between Dmax (assuming you expose and process to produce that) and paper base white (Dmin), obviously you can't process the paper any whiter so you need to increase Dmax, you can do that a small amount by Se toning.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrdarklight View Post
    .......I thought there were supposed to be numbers up the side of the support posts, so you could keep track of how high it was, etc. Mine doesn't have them.....
    I bought my 23C new in the 70's, and it did NOT have the scale on the column. The scale was an option at that time, and could be purchased separately.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveOttawa View Post
    I doubt if changing paper dev concentration would have much effect, ceratinly the Ilford data sheet doesn't suggest that it would. In any case it is likely to be very small, less than 1/2 grade.
    For a given development time, I wouldn't be surprised if it actually did. Obviously, no matter what dilution/time you use, you can't expect 5 more contrast grades from these.

    Quote Originally Posted by DaveOttawa View Post
    Contrast is the range between Dmax (assuming you expose and process to produce that) and paper base white (Dmin), obviously you can't process the paper any whiter so you need to increase Dmax, you can do that a small amount by Se toning.
    That's half the truth. Let's assume that you have made a print with a #2 filter, and the print has a full tonal range, from absolute white to absolute black (Dmax). Now, switch to #3 and expose for the same time. There will be more whites and more blacks, because you have altered the characteristic curve of the paper. In any case, some detail (if there was) will be lost. So, contrast is not the difference between Dmax - Dmin, but also the gradation between them, the steepness of the curve. You need to take both the Y (density) and the X (exposure) axis into account.

  10. #20
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    D-max is proportional to the slope of the HD curve (G or gamma or 'contrast') in negative material but since prints are usually processed to completion, that relationship does not usually apply to printing paper (as Anon Ymous pointed out).

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