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  1. #11

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    do it outside at night
    * Just because your eyes are closed, doesn't mean the lights in the darkroom are off. *
    * When the film you put in the camera is worth more than the camera you put the film in... *
    * When I started using 8x10, it amazed me how many shots were close to the car. *

  2. #12
    Jesper's Avatar
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    You can use drain pipes cut in half instead of trays (you can buy a length of drain pipe with a lid in each end, cut it in half and you have two trays).
    If you are not going to print bigger than 50x60 you can develop by yourself but get a friend to help you move the paper back and forth through the liquids if needed.

    It also works with sponges, but the risk of uneven development is great so I wouldn't recommend it (I do it myself so that is just how much my advice is worth). If you do it with sponges be sure to be generous with developer and use clean sponges.

  3. #13
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kaboom View Post
    Is there a way to develop paper that is significantly bigger than the trays you have?
    I just got a dated pack of ilford Ilfobrom in that size for 10€ and i was toying with the idea of making a huge poster of one of my favorite negs. If it isn't possible i'll just cut it up and use smaller sizes, which would be a shame!.
    cheers!
    The answer is an emphatic yes - so long as you have the means to either construct a large tube, or scab together a wooden tray lined with plastic sheetiing(or fiberglass it for permanence). I think the latter more easily accomplished. You only need one pan if you put a drain in it.If you have it on legs, make one leg slightly shorter to allow it to rock for aggitation. You could use a garden hose for rinsing . This really quite simple.
    Rick

  4. #14

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    I develop 24X30 in wallpaper trays by see-saw method. I suppose you could use the same way if you could make or buy trays long enough.
    Rick Jason.
    "I'm still developing"

  5. #15

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    If you are in the US, to go HomeDepot and get some of the orange wallpaper trays, the larger the better. Get an exposure and dev. time that you Dmax out your dev. I.E. you develope to about 3 or 4 minutes so there is no other development happening should you go over the time. Roll the paper in a tube shape, slip into the dev. then roll in the opposite direction. When you get to the end, take out of the dev., flip and repeat for the the 3 or 4 minutes. Do the same for all the chemicals. Basically you are doing mural print type development. Very easy actually and space taken is minimal...even less than 16x20 trays.

  6. #16

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    This is just an idea that I have not tried.
    How about a large thick pastic trash bag. Insert the paper and tape the edges except for one corner. Pour in a liter or so of developer and lay it on the floor while holding the corner closed. Have someone else help move the liquid back and forth. When finished pour off devloper into a bucket and add stop. continue on with fix. Perhaps you could just hose off the final print as a wash step or do several changes of water as per Ilford method. PS if this is fiber paper better use something like TF4 fixer to shorten the wash step.

  7. #17
    Jon Shiu's Avatar
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    Is it 50x60 inches, or 50x60cm or some other type of units?

    Jon

    edit: 50x60cm is about 20x24 inches. Come to think of it 50x60 inches is not a realistic paper size. I recommend just getting a print developing drum or single tray processing in a 20x24 inch tray.
    Last edited by Jon Shiu; 09-26-2009 at 03:22 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Mendocino Coast Black and White Photography: www.jonshiu.com

  8. #18
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    A few suggestions, I've made troughs with bits of wood and thick plastic & see sawed images, 40" wide by 6 ft.

    I've also pinned the paper on a board and sprayed dev, stop, fix etc.

    But these days I use a Sponge or 3

    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Sponges will not give you the uniformity you need.
    Best of luck.
    PE
    There are trade secrets to all these techniques, with Sponges you must use the developer more dilute than normal, or as Ron says uniformity is a huge problem. If it's usually 1+9 for that paper/dev then 1+14 or even 1+19, is needed, the dev time is greatly extended maybe 4-6 minutes, adding extra Sodium Sulphite helps with aerial oxidation, and some wetting agent works wonders as well.

    That's how I currently make the few large FB prints I sometimes require for exhibitions. It's a piece of cake with RC prints

    Ian

  9. #19
    Dave Pritchard's Avatar
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    I've been thinking about this problem. It's a good one. Handling the wet paper is, I think, one of the biggest problems. I'd start with making a single tray, lined with plastic sheeting. The paper goes in and stays there throughout the process. That means you have to get chemistry in and out of the single tray. Some means of tilting the tray with levers or rollers would work to both agitate and tip out the chemistry. I think it may even work to capture the paper in the tray using screen mesh. That way, the entire tray could be stood on end to tip out chemistry or wash water.

    I'd also suggest calculating the amount of developer you will need on the paper, just so you don't under-develop.

    If you are really creative, the tray could be curved. The entire thing would rock. Think about using very thin plywood to make it. You could pour a relatively small amount of chemistry in, and rock the curved tray to move the chemistry from one end to another.

  10. #20
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Don't think too hard Dave, it's far easier to just do it & build 3 trays on a flat concrete (or similar) floor

    Prints wash in the bath

    Ian

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