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  1. #1

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    Is it possible to develop 50x60 paper without adequate trays?

    Is there a way to develop paper that is significantly bigger than the trays you have?
    I just got a dated pack of ilford Ilfobrom in that size for 10€ and i was toying with the idea of making a huge poster of one of my favorite negs. If it isn't possible i'll just cut it up and use smaller sizes, which would be a shame!.
    cheers!

  2. #2
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Depends what kind of space you have. You can make containers using a rough wooden frame lined with sheet plastic. I worked one summer for a guy who did life-size prints of rock performers. The trays were shaped rather like today's pans for wetting wall-paper--although much bigger. The trick is to roll the paper up loosely; then roll and unroll it in the chemicals.
    Come to think of it, I think the "trays" were actually for developing Cirkut camera negs and prints--but the rock performer blowups were much, much bigger.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  3. #3
    Jon Shiu's Avatar
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    I have seen large print developing tubes where you pour the chemicals in. Perhaps you could make a homemade one.

    Jon
    Mendocino Coast Black and White Photography: www.jonshiu.com

  4. #4
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    You can roll it through the developer (like a poster) instead of using an appropriately-sized tray. Roll it through one way and then flip it and do it the other way until it is done. Just be very careful not to kink or scratch the paper. Move slowly. There is no rush.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  5. #5

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    I would build wooden frames from 2x2 lumber and line them with thick sheet plastic then fill them to 1/2" from the top... yes that's a lot of chemistry... and a lot of floor space. I would use diluted developer because it will take awhile to fully submerse the print and attain even agitation/development. Initial submersion into the developer... lay the exposed paper flat on one edge of the makeshift tray then gently pull it through to the far side of the tray while keeping the leading edge just a smidge off the bottom of the tray but the top under the surface of the chemistry. Agitation is via gently sloshing your gloved hands all around the surface of the print. Of course. the method changes after the paper is wet. You'll need to "guess" at where the far edge of the stop bath tray is and gently lay it down then used motions from the inside of the print out to force the chemistry from under the print to the outer edges wher you then pull the chemistry inward toward the center of the print.

    You REALLY need a second person to make this work.

    There really is no easy way to hand process monster sized prints like that and there is a very good chance you will not fully succeed.
    Last edited by Mike1234; 09-25-2009 at 05:12 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #6
    Marc Leest's Avatar
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    I've heard that you could develop/fix with a sponge. Never tried it myself however.

    Marc
    We cannot change how the cards are dealt, just how to play the hand...
    Randy Pausch

  7. #7
    richard ide's Avatar
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    I have made large prints in an apartment by wetting the wall of the shower/bathtub to hold the paper in place and develop, stop, fix with sponges and then washing the print in the tub. Worked very well.
    Richard

    Why are there no speaker jacks on a stereo camera?

  8. #8

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    i think it might have been a rash decision...
    Until i bring the pack home (its waiting for me back at the shop, i rode the fixie there today and could only carry back small items) i'm not entirely certain i even have the SPACE to fit three trays that size...
    this obviously poses some severe logistics problems...
    I think since i got it for so little i'll go with Richard's method. I'll lightproof the toilet and develop there with sponges. It'd better not stain much or some people will be getting quite upset...
    If that doesn't work i'll move onto carpentry. The mere thought of a self-made poster of that particular picture hanging on my room's wall warrants the effort!

  9. #9
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Sponges will not give you the uniformity you need.

    Best of luck.

    PE

  10. #10
    elbuveli2ETHPY's Avatar
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    Marc Leest,dit is al een hele oude techniek,je kunt er bepaalde veeg-effecten mee bereiken,zo-dat het lijkt alsof je een bewasemt raam schoon veegt om even naar buiten te gluren,bijvoorbeeld.

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