Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 73,883   Posts: 1,629,729   Online: 751
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17
  1. #11
    ozphoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Bangkok, Thailand
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,177
    Images
    1
    Yes it sounds as if your exposure time is way too much for your neg.
    f8 @ 10-15secs for a normal neg (good range of tones between black and white) may be a good starting point at grade 2-3.

    Again, it will depend on your paper selection and negative as to what exposure time you require. I have always used Agfa paper at grade 2- 21/2; when I went to college, their paper of choice was Ilford - try as I might, I couldn't get a good exposure from any of my negs without using Grade 3-4. It used to drive me crazy!! Finally I gave up and switched back to my Agfa paper and all was good for me. No idea why, but I consistently got good results and decided not to change papers simply because that was what they were supplying (at a cost).

    Find a film, developer and paper, developer you are happy with and getting good results from. Once you've mastered the exposure development stages for both of these, you can start experimenting with other combination's - I'm only now starting to use some old Ilford graded paper again from which I am getting some acceptable results from; use this mostly for my Postcard exchange pictures along with old paper as well.

  2. #12
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,465
    Images
    60
    I've looked at the manufacturer's website, and it indicates that you should be mixing your developer with 1 part concentrate added to 15 parts water (2 oz diluted to make 1 US quart).

    Based on that, the manufacturer recommends a development time between 2 minutes and 3.5 minutes.

    Given that, the best way to approach this is to standardize on a development time (I'd suggest 2.5 minutes), stop down the enlarger lens 3 or 4 stops, and then do test strips with several exposures (6, 8, 11, 16, 32 and 45 seconds is a useful progression). Develop your test strips for the standardized time (and don't vary from that time). Use the test strip to determine a useful standard exposure for that much magnification and that aperture.

    And then go from there.

    Matt

    P.S. here is the link: http://www.altaphotographic.com/zonal.html

  3. #13
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Central florida,USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    7,044
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    Pale blobs can be caused by air bubbles, which is a matter of technique in how you get the print into the tray. Dark blobs, I don't know. I've had 'em a couple of times but not known why.

    I slide the print in face down, poke the back a few times with tongs so it's all submerged then flip it over with the tongs. Then start rocking and you should see that the whole face side is completely wetted. If you leave it face-down, you can get air-bubbles trapped. If you put it in face-up first, it gets wet unevenly at first though I suspect that's probably not a problem. Poking the emulsion side with tongs to submerge it could be bad though, hence the slide, poke, flip, rock sequence.
    I agree, but there is no need to poke the print from front or back. Just place it on top of the liquid surface and rock the tray. The print will submerge within seconds.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  4. #14
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,573
    Some RC paper floats pretty well when one surface is still dry.

    In my experience:
    Glossy RC = most prone to not 'wet' and to from bubbles and air pockets. Some of this stuff develops quickly, and it floats, so with a big glossy RC 16x20 I rapidly immerse it emulsion up and pad it down. If I don't watch the reflection carefully in the safelight it is easy to miss an area that will remain 'dry.'
    Satin RC = better than above
    "Glossy" FB = about the same as Satin RC

  5. #15
    Aron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Hungary
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    253
    While the problem comes most likely from processing, black spots can appear also in these two cases:

    -dust on negative during exposure (maybe)
    -tiny scratches or badly deteriorated emulsion (unlikely).

    I came across the latter while printing some glass plates from the '20s.

  6. #16
    polyglot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    South Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,433
    Images
    12
    How does a dusty neg cause black spots? Surely you'd get white ones?

    The only times I've had black spots was with one particular neg, but the spots came out in different places each time I printed so I suspect it was a paper issue or me getting something on the paper.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Live Free or Die
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,673
    Images
    91
    If dust is on the film prior to exposure, it will leave a clear spot, which prints black. It's generally not a problem with roll films, but does plague sheet film users occasionally.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin