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  1. #11
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    It may depend on ones setup. If you use 35mm, develop in Rodinal and make relatively large prints, you don't need a lot of magnification to focus on the grain (naked eye would probably work), but with fine-grain, large-format negatives and relatively small prints, I just don't see any grain at 10x.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  2. #12
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    Do you see a hair-line in the viewer? You'd screw/unscrew so that the hair-line is sharply in focus. This is a necessary step and it is to calibrate the device to your eyes. Then, you'd use the device to focus on the grain.

    I believe the model you have is a smaller one of two with 10x magnification.

    If you have trouble seeing well, MagnaSight, which is a image focuser, not a grain focuser, may be a better option. I have one and it works well. What happens is, the image get projected to a ground glass. There is an 8x magnifier to view this image for the purpose of focusing. You can see the magnified image well from 1 foot away.
    Nope no hairline to focus the focuser??? The lens is just clear...I don't know if it "crosshairs" are missing or what, I bought it from ebay. Is there another method for focusing the "focuser" for my ey?
    Last edited by stradibarrius; 01-26-2010 at 05:36 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
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    Barry
    Monroe, GA

  3. #13
    Jon Shiu's Avatar
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    Hi, you need to put the reference line back in place. Open the bottom of the tube of the scope and you will see where the nylon line was glued in place. Just get a piece of nylon mono fishing line/thread and glue it back where it was.

    After that, always focus so that you can see both the line and grain in focus at the same time.

    Jon
    Mendocino Coast Black and White Photography: www.jonshiu.com

  4. #14

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    Another vote for the Magnasight.
    I have one along with a Paterson Major Focus Finder but find the Magnasight is pretty much all I use.

  5. #15
    Jerevan's Avatar
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    I like the construction of the Peak but I do prefer the Microsight and its higher magnification.
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by mwdake View Post
    Another vote for the Magnasight.
    I have one along with a Paterson Major Focus Finder but find the Magnasight is pretty much all I use.
    Just out of curiosity, does anyone know what magnification is provided by the Paterson? Is it greater or less than the Magnasight? I find that with the Paterson grain in a MF neg from the likes of the Delta range developed in a fine grain dev such as Perceptol does start to present a challenge for the Paterson although grain can just about be seen if you are careful with the focusing.

    pentaxuser

  7. #17
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    To focus my MicroSight "focuser", could i use a 35mm negative, for the grain, turn the enlarger on and by adjusting the focuser and the enlarger focus "dial" in the sharpest focus on the "focuser?
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
    Flicker http://www.flickr.com/photos/stradibarrius
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    Barry
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  8. #18
    Jon Shiu's Avatar
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    You do need to see the line and grain both in focus at the same time, so I would replace the line.

    Jon
    Mendocino Coast Black and White Photography: www.jonshiu.com

  9. #19

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    normal eyes here. the blue one does the job. highest praise in my book: never occurred to me i might upgrade

    ps. the "blue one" is the blue one in the B&H link. label is long gone so i had no idea what it was

  10. #20
    Jon Shiu's Avatar
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    I use the small blue one also called minisight. It is 10x.

    Jon
    Mendocino Coast Black and White Photography: www.jonshiu.com

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