Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 72,558   Posts: 1,599,354   Online: 990
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 28 of 28
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,007
    Images
    1
    you go around in little circles... you blend it into the rest of the neg. be bold

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    25

    fine scratches

    nose oil what brand your own works very well
    have tried baby oil read somwhere that baby oil in a neg well
    just over the size of your neg and filled with baby oil depth 1 layer of
    masking tape very messy and to me was a desperation measure
    on my durst I have printed some 50-60 year old negs that looked shocking yet the marks did not show at all
    regards'Barry Treleaven

  3. #23

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    336
    Sean, since I use film that has been regularly handled since the 1950's, I see that non-emulsion side scratching a lot. The cold light head with the f-stop open wider than you would normally prefer and a very short shot can help. When I bought this place the aerials were done on an old 1940's box enlarger with a warm halogen light head, when I switched to the brighter and cold light of the copy cameras virtually every scratch "disappeared", but no loss in the emulsion side information.
    Now I do extreme enlargements with the least being equivalent to a 10 x 12 from a 35mm, maybe that simply keeps the non-emulsion from being in focus, but honestly the old enlarger at the same scale would just be a mess really, now poof all gone.

  4. #24

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    336
    I have also heard but never used, petroleum jelly lightly on the scratched side, but I would imagine that unless you have a glassless neg carrier it would cause bizarre newton type rings.

  5. #25
    geraldatwork's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Hicksville, NY
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    414
    Images
    24
    Thinking positively, my gut feeling is the scratches won't show up especially if you use a diffusion enlarger. Maybe you could carefully look at them under a loupe or camera lens. You might get a better idea what caused them and if they will show up in printing. Certainly don't do anything to the negatives until you find out how the prints look under normal printing techniques.

  6. #26
    Eric Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    124
    Images
    16
    Hello All,

    If you try all of the other methods and they all fail to produce the result you want, you may want to try this hybrid digital/analog method. Have a drum scan made, the fluid mounting will fill in most if not all of the base scratches, touch up in PS and then record the result back to film with a film recorder. Print normally on your enlarger. I had some extremely damged negs and this method worked out very well for me. It is naturally the most expensive way to go....but this is your best work in 10 years and reshooting may not have the same "magic" that your orignal shoot had. So, that is just another option. Best of luck.

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Suffolk UK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6
    Images
    1
    Many years ago I processed two rolls of XP1 which had heavy scratch marks on the first 12 frames. As I had used two different cameras and two different developing tanks I more or less rules out any faults with the camera and processing ( which would of been my first thought had only one camera been uses).

    I contacted Ilford who were aware of this problem and asked me to return the films with as much information as possible. It turned out that the problem was in the adhesive which glues the felt light trap to the cassette; it was too hard and was scratching the film as it pulled out of the cassette.

    This does not help you with your scratched film but it may point towards the source of the scratches.

    Ernie

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    243
    If you could find some Edwal Permafilm - that would solve the problem. Permafilm was developed for the motion picture industry to clean and "repair" release prints at motion picture theaters. It is some amazing stuff and will absolutely eliminate problems with scratches on the backing side of film.

    My second choice would be Edwal No Scratch or Hide-A-Scratch.

    You've gotten the nose oil solution - works sometimes. You can also use Vaseline applied in a very thin coat.

    In a pinch, I've made up a very thin solution of lacquer and lacquered the back side of the film. You used to be able to buy film lacquer for just that purpose - but, I haven't seen actual film lacquer available for at least 30 or more years.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin