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  1. #1
    Sean's Avatar
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    are 35mm negs with very fine scratches..

    I'm hating life right now. Just processed 2 rolls of tri-x 35mm, possibly some of the best work I've done in 10 years on these rolls. The negs look awesome, yet my camera has most likely ruined several areas of the negs with very fine scratches, some very long. I am holding out hope that maybe they will still be printable. The scratches are on the non-emulsion side and are very faint but if twisting the neg under light you can see them in the reflection. I have no idea how they got there, I examined the pressure plate and it was spotless. I took a roll out that was in the camera mid-roll and sure enough there they were but when taking out fresh film from the roll they were not there. Maybe this is what I get for selling my M6!

    Anyway, I won't be able to print for a few months so am wondering if any of you guys have managed to print negs with these very fine scratches on them. Maybe they will come out ok using my cold light head, I am not sure. grrr...

  2. #2
    Sean's Avatar
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    I've heard of a product called Edwal No Scratch , maybe this can help? Sure don't want to loose these negs!

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    I would print them irregardless of the scratches. I would not put much hope in the cold light head, you are enlarging after all. The Edwal sounds like a good idea. Lastly, a reshoot possible?
    Francesco

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    Sean,
    old film material is sometimes copied on special immersion oil carriers. I've tried this once. It is a mess, but it worked in the sense that it was at least an improvement. Try immersion oil used for microscopes. You can clean the film with isopropanol afterwards. There might exist some oil that matches the refractive index of the film carrier even better. Good luck.

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    Sean's Avatar
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    I guess first I'll try printing them, then the edwal no scratch, then reshoot. I do have some hope after reading about edwal no scratch working for fine base scratches. I think my emulsion is in the clear so maybe I'll be ok.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean
    I guess first I'll try printing them, then the edwal no scratch, then reshoot. I do have some hope after reading about edwal no scratch working for fine base scratches. I think my emulsion is in the clear so maybe I'll be ok.
    another quick trick for scratched emulsion is to soak the film in about 80F degree water . That swells the emulsion and on fine scratches it helps to reconnect and fill in the scratch. It can't hurt. 'm taking it was B&W film. Color would have to be about 5 degrees warmer than what you processed it at.

  7. #7

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    nose oil!

    you rub your finger on the side of your nose (or forehead, etc) and then over the scratch on the neg... (you need to blend it around a bit) Works very well! Saved me several times! I clean them afterwards with some film cleaner stuff.

  8. #8

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    I've been having the same problem recently, at first I thought it was the camera but now I suspect it's the reel in the developing tank. The reason is that my mother has also started to have the same problem, with two other cameras. The only common factor was our development gear... She also shot some slides which were developed in a pro lab and they were not scratched.

  9. #9
    gma
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    Avoid using a condenser enlarger. Scratches will be less visible or not visible at all using diffuser enlarger. The oil from the skin rubbed into the film base side idea will certainly help also, as weird as it sounds. I have used that technique. I have not used any of the proprietary scratch eliminator fluids.

  10. #10
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    If you were shooting in a dusty environment you may have gotten dirt into the felt of the cassete when changing film. If you also remove the film for developing by pulling the leader out instead of popping the cassette it would compound the problem.Tell me, is this factory loads or bulk loaded film? You need to clean the cassettes occasionally for the bulk loads and toss them when they get rough looking. I've also seen cheap cassetes get a fine bit of rust inside them and make scratches.
    Aother boo boo I've done is to forget to open the gate on the reloader when I start winding the film in. Talk about scratches!
    Gary Beasley

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