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  1. #11
    eclarke's Avatar
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    Did you see prints in person? Can't make any decisions about prints without seeing the real thing...Evan Clarke

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by darkosaric View Post
    This example is from that movie. Other photos also, but this one most.
    I don't see anything going on there except depth of field.

  3. #13
    bsdunek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darkosaric View Post
    This example is from that movie. Other photos also, but this one most.
    Depth of field control is the big factor in this photo. The boy is very close and sharp, while the background is soft. It certainly does exhibit the depth.
    Bruce

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  4. #14
    darkosaric's Avatar
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    But I think is not only depth of field ... I don't know - it looks like this boy is jumping out of picture . It is more visible in movie when they printed this photo many times, and then final print was huge, perfect, and ... well - three dimensional .

  5. #15

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    In this photo it looks mostly like selective depth of field to me. Also using a moderately wide angle lens for this sort of work can enhance the separation of foreground and background, particularly when you get very close to the foreground subject. I don't see anything fancy going on in this image/print. Of course, a fine print certainly adds depth to an image with these characteristics. Practice, practice, practice. It has little to do with having a Leitz lens. As long as you have a high quality lens with good contrast, spending extra $$$$$$ on Leitz equipment will get you nowhere. Ditto for the endless search for the perfect chemicals, papers etc. Practice seeing and printing.

  6. #16
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Posted wirelessly..

    Before reading through the replies and having not even looked at the photograph, my first suggestion was shoot close up and opened up as far as feasible. That, coupled with good contrast and, at the very least, decent printing skills would provide a visually engaging image. As long as the camera is not aimed at the trash heap.
    Thank you.
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    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  7. #17

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    I agree with pretty much everything stated, but I also think this is a clear case of "good bokah". The out of focus areas blur in a manner similar to how your eye will blur. To my mind this enhances the 3D effect a lot. It is something I noticed when I moved from cheap aftermarket zooms to Nikkor primes, the prints had a lot more "snap" to them.

    -Harry

  8. #18
    MattKing's Avatar
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    The example photograph has a 3 dimensional appearance because, among other things:

    1) There is a clear foreground, and an obvious background, and they are well differentiated;
    2) The foreground subject is both 3 dimensional, and of a shape that is known to be 3 dimensional, so we recognize it as such. In comparison, the background is somewhat 2 dimensional;
    3) The tones and micro-contrast in the foreground are distinctive and attractive. The background is blurred, has more macro-contrast than micro-contrast, and generally is of a different tone, so the foreground and background are strongly differentiated.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #19
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    Here is a scan of a carbon print -- you can't see the raised relief, but the image itself seems to have depth to it -- all is in focus, "normal" lens for the format (300mm on 8x10).

    It seems to cover the points df mentioned, and the first point (and perhaps the second) the Matt mentioned.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails RedwoodVineMaple.jpg  
    Last edited by Vaughn; 06-09-2010 at 11:41 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  10. #20
    darkosaric's Avatar
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    Thank you all for answers. I am attaching screen shots from movie, maybe it is more visible why I was impressed with 3-D of this picture
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails shot0001.jpg   shot0002.jpg   shot0004.jpg  

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