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  1. #21
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    I agree with df cardwell. Learn to see as well as compose.

    check out this link:

    http://www.cycleback.com/2dart.html

  2. #22
    clayne's Avatar
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    darkosaric, weren't you just last week asking about the techniques Salgado used in achieving his "look" ? I think you're missing or (possibly ignoring) very important points that there is no magic recipe or bullet for any of this. Even if a particular look or style could be distilled to something specific, merely using it would not impart the same feeling - and it surely wouldn't appear genuine.

    Hard work and attempting to learn what they see will send you down a more fruitful avenue than any attempt at explaining how something was printed. Nachtwey and his printer are both experts at what they do. They didn't get that way overnight.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  3. #23
    5stringdeath's Avatar
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    Great Lens.
    Depth of Field (in the sample photo.)
    Rodinal.

  4. #24
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    So true

    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    darkosaric, weren't you just last week asking about the techniques Salgado used in achieving his "look" ? I think you're missing or (possibly ignoring) very important points that there is no magic recipe or bullet for any of this. Even if a particular look or style could be distilled to something specific, merely using it would not impart the same feeling - and it surely wouldn't appear genuine.

    Hard work and attempting to learn what they see will send you down a more fruitful avenue than any attempt at explaining how something was printed. Nachtwey and his printer are both experts at what they do. They didn't get that way overnight.
    Photography just like anything else in life, you just gotta keep practicing to get better. Just like playing a piano or riding a bike. So all APUGers, pick up a camera and shoot some film!

  5. #25
    darkosaric's Avatar
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    I do shoot a lot and print a lot , specially now in spring and summer ... but in parallel I am trying to discuss with you guys here about some theoretical aspects - I think that this will help me also in making my work better. When I see something that get my attention - I ask here about this. This is only place where I can discuss about it ... it is not like I have 10 friends that are also using film. Everybody around me have D700, D90 and other digi stuff.

  6. #26
    clayne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darkosaric View Post
    I do shoot a lot and print a lot , specially now in spring and summer ... but in parallel I am trying to discuss with you guys here about some theoretical aspects - I think that this will help me also in making my work better. When I see something that get my attention - I ask here about this. This is only place where I can discuss about it ... it is not like I have 10 friends that are also using film. Everybody around me have D700, D90 and other digi stuff.
    Your absolute best bet would be to examine what it is IN the photography you admire that makes your eyes open and react positively to it. One cannot reduce this down to a mathematical or otherwise formula, they can only attempt to figure out some semblance of it and walk in the footsteps of masters. Somewhere during that walk you'll start your own trail.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  7. #27
    nsurit's Avatar
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    Use some alt process, print on vellum, back it with a reflective material like a silver poster board. Bill Barber

  8. #28

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    What makes a 3-D image....Matt King gave a good summary. It takes a while for a new photographer to notice this 3D effect. Recognition comes from looking at a lot of images and to some extent printing. Images with a subject shot close using large apertures to blur backgrounds are the starting point. Older lenses (prior to late 80s) tend to have high macro contrast of large subject outlines and a smooth out of focus background. Summicrons and Zeiss glass from the 50s and 60s typically have these qualities. A circular shutter in older lenses compliments this look. Cannon, Pentax, Olympus Zukio, Minolta and some Nikon 35mm optics designed in the 50/60/70s have this look. Achieving a smooth 3-D look is easier using medium format. MF records more detail and has inherent shallower DOF. My 1956 Rollei Twin Lens 80mm f/2.8 consistently has this look at f/4. Most older lenses are sharpest 1-2 stops closed down from the widest aperture.

    As color film became popular the design bias tilted towards high optic contrast. Higher contrast was achieved by reducing spherical aberrations. The result was higher micro contrast with less smooth background blurs.

    So subject placement, background contrast, aperture setting, optics and film format are keys in achieving a 3-D look. Using fiber paper toned in selenium compliments the look. Fiber gives more depth and combined with toning increases macro/micro contrast which makes the print come alive.

    It is important to share information. The photo community is small but vibrant.
    Last edited by Richard Jepsen; 06-27-2010 at 09:29 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    RJ

  9. #29
    darinwc's Avatar
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    Posted wirelessly..

    The original image has as much to do with thos as the print.

    A scene with flat lighting will look flat no matter what.
    Go not to the elves for counsel, for they will say both yes and no.

  10. #30
    darinwc's Avatar
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    Posted wirelessly..

    The original image has as much to do with thos as the print.

    A scene with flat lighting will look flat no matter what.
    Go not to the elves for counsel, for they will say both yes and no.

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