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  1. #1
    darkosaric's Avatar
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    How to make your print more "three-dimensional"

    Hi,

    while watching "War photographer" movie I noticed that final prints from James Nachtwey are extremely three-dimensional (ok - they are done by some top fine print expert, but anyhow ...).

    Are there some tricks to make prints more "three-dimensional"? I have been told that leitz lenses are more "3D" than other? Or maybe to use some other paper developer than my standard one (ilford multigrade)?

    thanks,

  2. #2
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Try carbon printing -- the prints can be literally 3-D...the blacks rise higher off the paper than the whites, creating a raised relief.

    Sorry, not the answer you were looking for, but could not resist!
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  3. #3

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    I'm blind in one eye so what is 3-D?

    Perhaps it is the way James composes and uses light to sculpt his subjects that gives you the illusion of 3-D?
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  4. #4
    phaedrus's Avatar
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    As is so often the case, it will be a combination of factors. Having good lenses won't hurt, neither will exposing right and seeing and using the light. But I suspect the printing controls like dodging, burning, local contrast enhancement, toning and so on make the most difference. He has a good printer.

  5. #5
    jmcd's Avatar
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    I think 3d has a lot to do with contrast. Getting it to look really good means many factors have come together properly, including an effective f-stop for a given subject and its distance from the camera. I have a Canon 35/2 with the concave element, and it is tricky to handle just right. What has happened to me with some images is that the subject stands so apart from the background that it looks cut out and pasted on—3d, but in a bad way in this instance.

    A back light at about 180 degrees to the key light will greatly enhance the depth of an image. If it is balanced just about 1/2 stop brighter than the key, it looks subtle, without a tell-tale halo, but the depth is enhanced.

  6. #6
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    How to make your print more "three-dimensional"

    There are no special tricks here. You need to not discount the skill of the printer. It's not about equipment.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  7. #7
    dentkimterry's Avatar
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    Selenium toning makes my prints look more 3-D

    Terry

  8. #8
    jp80874's Avatar
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    Darko,

    Could you show us examples, or give us links to examples, of pictures that you see as 3D? Perhaps that would help me understand what you mean and us answer your question.

    John Powers

  9. #9
    darkosaric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jp80874 View Post
    Darko,

    Could you show us examples, or give us links to examples, of pictures that you see as 3D? Perhaps that would help me understand what you mean and us answer your question.

    John Powers
    This example is from that movie. Other photos also, but this one most.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails james_nachtwey.jpg  

  10. #10
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Here are the top 5....

    5. Expose enough, but not too much. A deep, pure black gives us shadow accents that help us perceive depth in the 2 D pictures.
    4. Develop enough, but not too much. Local contrast sets detail against detail, necessary to the illusion.
    3. Use light to separate form and mass. We're photographing the light, aren't we ?
    2. Use contrasting tones to make the picture. Nachtwey is drawn to scenes that reveal themselves.
    1. Learn to see.

    Study, learn, practice. Post your successes.

    .
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

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