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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jarvman View Post
    I hope to begin using factorial development with my newly acquired processmaster to get consistency from print to print. Only thing that confounds me is that the recommended factor is times 6. My image emerges in 40-60secs on foma 123 with Ilford warmtone dev (1+9) at 20 degrees. If I follow a factor of six, my development times are going to be around 6 mins. That doesn't seem right to me. What are your thoughts on this? Cheers
    The pleasure of making a print is about watching it develop and making a decision about when its 'ready', rather than relying on some instrument to tell you. If the instrument gets one right all the others will be progressively worse.
    Mark
    Mark Layne
    Nova Scotia
    and Barbados

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nige View Post
    This concept always amused/bemused me. At just what point is the emergence point? The 1st point you can see anything appearing?
    Nige, according to Ansel's "The Print", the best area of the print to observe for emergence should be a middle value around Value IV-V that shows texture (e.g., foliage). When you see that area become faintly visible, note the time the print has been in the developer.

  3. #13
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by monodave View Post
    Paper is processed to completion, usually within 2 minutes or so. It doesn't matter if you process for 6 minutes or 20 the only change you will see is more base fog. I have used a variation of factorial development in photo chemical product development when I worked for Ilford but can't see how it can help with print dev times. Suggest you keep it simple. Don't snatch your prints out before development is complete. Change your exposure time and contrast to get print to print consistency. Dave
    Sorry, can't agree with that. There is no such thing as developing to completion.

    Resin-coated papers develop much quicker, and initially much faster, than their fiber-base counterparts, but all image tones rapidly gain print density at first, with the darkest images tones quickly reaching maximum print density. All other image tones gradually, and without any sign of reaching completion, continue to increase in density, if left in the developer.

    Don't be talked out of factorial development; it's a good thing!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails FactorialDev2.jpg  
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  4. #14
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jarvman View Post
    I hope to begin using factorial development with my newly acquired processmaster to get consistency from print to print. Only thing that confounds me is that the recommended factor is times 6. My image emerges in 40-60secs on foma 123 with Ilford warmtone dev (1+9) at 20 degrees. If I follow a factor of six, my development times are going to be around 6 mins. That doesn't seem right to me. What are your thoughts on this? Cheers
    Go for it! It works just fine. Adjust the development factor to your liking. I've seen people use anything from 4-8x.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  5. #15

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    Cheers ralph, I'll start off with a factor of 4 with this particular paper/dev combo and see how things go. Seems to be a contentious topic this one.

  6. #16
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I use a form of factorial development most often when I'm using waterbath technique with amidol and Azo, Lodima, or Emaks. My usual cycle is for the waterbath time to be twice the emergence time. Then if the print needs to go back into the developer for another cycle, my usual starting point is based on the emergence time.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  7. #17
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    Sorry, can't agree with that. There is no such thing as developing to completion.
    Perhaps not but in reality it gets to a point where it slows down so much that if you give it twice the time it takes for you to think it is done it will be o.k.

    That's my method anyway. Wait until it appears to have darkened as much as it is going to and has effectively stopped and keep it in there for around that time again.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    Sorry, can't agree with that. There is no such thing as developing to completion.

    Resin-coated papers develop much quicker, and initially much faster, than their fiber-base counterparts, but all image tones rapidly gain print density at first, with the darkest images tones quickly reaching maximum print density. All other image tones gradually, and without any sign of reaching completion, continue to increase in density, if left in the developer.

    Don't be talked out of factorial development; it's a good thing!
    Well Ralph, if you're willing to endorse it I'll apologize and recant my thinking on it. It may work well for some folks, just not me
    Mark
    Mark Layne
    Nova Scotia
    and Barbados

  9. #19
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    Perhaps not but in reality it gets to a point where it slows down so much that if you give it twice the time it takes for you to think it is done it will be o.k.

    That's my method anyway. Wait until it appears to have darkened as much as it is going to and has effectively stopped and keep it in there for around that time again.


    Steve.
    Steve

    The trouble is, it's very hard to judge print tones under safelights.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  10. #20
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Layne View Post
    Well Ralph, if you're willing to endorse it I'll apologize and recant my thinking on it. It may work well for some folks, just not me
    Mark
    I admit, it is a very subjective method and probably not ideal for everyone.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

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