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  1. #21
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    There are two ways to mask.

    One is to make a negative mask as discussed above.

    The other is to take a print and cut a way the sky. Then use the print to dodge and burn in the sky by moving it slightly back and forth and slightly raising and lowing it.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  2. #22

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    I have sometimes had this problem. When you have an odd shaped area to dodge, you can make a custom dodging mask for it. This is not always the answer, but it often works. Focus the negative on the easel. Take a piece of thin cardboard, and hold it under the lens some distance above the easel - a comfortable dodging distance. Mark the dodging pattern on the cardboard with a felt tipped marker, and cut it our. The use the shaped cardboard as a dodging tool.

  3. #23
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    That's what I would normally do. However there is a row of leafless trees on the horizon and it would be impossible to cut the cardboard out for all the branches.
    f/22 and be there.

  4. #24
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    For the heck of it you could also attempt a high contrast over-exposure combined with a SLIMT bath. Less work than a complicated mask and doesn't take a lot of attempts to figure out if it'll work.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  5. #25
    rudolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    Better Sense

    Flashing helps but doesn't solve most cases. A mask will do the trick, but you need patience and a bit of time. The reward is worth it. Look at the attached example:
    [...]
    Ralph, do you have some tips for cutting the mask?
    I always admire the precision of your masking :)

    Best,
    Marcin "Rudolf" Szymczak
    Author of 13th Frame
    marcinszymczak.com

  6. #26
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rudolf View Post
    Ralph, do you have some tips for cutting the mask?
    I always admire the precision of your masking

    Best,
    I use an overexposed test print, glue it to a scrap piece of mounting board, cut the shape I need out with a exacto knife and paint the edges with a red or black marker. Any tell-tale signs on the final print are spotted.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  7. #27
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    So are you using the mounting board along with the print, as the mask?

    Do you use RC paper? I don't use FB paper much, but I always wondered if the dimensions changed too much from processing for this technique to work.
    f/22 and be there.

  8. #28
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    So are you using the mounting board along with the print, as the mask? ...
    Yes, unless I can use a sketched-on mounting board alone. (see attached)

    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    ... Do you use RC paper? I don't use FB paper much, but I always wondered if the dimensions changed too much from processing for this technique to work.
    I use RC when using a test print as a mask.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails PrintMask.jpg  
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  9. #29

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    When I got my first job in a studio, my primary job was printing the commercial jobs and that required a lot of learning. I was fortunate to have a master printer for my mentor and the following was one of the tricks he taught me. Years later when I went out on my own, aside from photographing and to supplement my income, I used to print for a few pro's and if I had to print multiple prints of the same problem neg, I used a jiggle frame and a sheet of 11x14 clear glass, mounted on four springs. A piece of tissue was temporarily taped to the bottom of the glass and all the dodging masking was done on the top of the glass with croesine or ink, then the tissue was removed and the frame was started in motion with a flick on the right bottom corner of the frame and the exposure started leaving both hands free for burning and additional wand dodging of larger areas. The finer the detail the closer to the print the jiggle frame was placed. With this method you can print many nearly identical prints where very complex dodging and burning was required. This technique along with perspective correction easel mounts was used in many labs that specialized in printing commercial work for advertising and architecture.
    Denise Libby

  10. #30
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    very good tip, I use to have a glass setup to put in the light path it was adjustable for different heights.
    this was a old photocomp trick for complex masking as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by archer View Post
    When I got my first job in a studio, my primary job was printing the commercial jobs and that required a lot of learning. I was fortunate to have a master printer for my mentor and the following was one of the tricks he taught me. Years later when I went out on my own, aside from photographing and to supplement my income, I used to print for a few pro's and if I had to print multiple prints of the same problem neg, I used a jiggle frame and a sheet of 11x14 clear glass, mounted on four springs. A piece of tissue was temporarily taped to the bottom of the glass and all the dodging masking was done on the top of the glass with croesine or ink, then the tissue was removed and the frame was started in motion with a flick on the right bottom corner of the frame and the exposure started leaving both hands free for burning and additional wand dodging of larger areas. The finer the detail the closer to the print the jiggle frame was placed. With this method you can print many nearly identical prints where very complex dodging and burning was required. This technique along with perspective correction easel mounts was used in many labs that specialized in printing commercial work for advertising and architecture.
    Denise Libby

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