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Thread: worry lines

  1. #1
    darinwc's Avatar
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    What is the best way to soften select areas of a print?
    I have a photo of a bride and she is very self-concious about her worry lines.
    Go not to the elves for counsel, for they will say both yes and no.

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    the cellophane that wraps boxes of tea sometimes
    works wonders ... but you can't have a heavy hand ...

  3. #3
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Just be aware that if you choose to soften at the print enlarging stage, you are effectively blurring the shadows (the projected light). This is a distinctly different effect than choosing to soften at the film exposure stage, where you are effectively softening the highlights (the imaging light). Most people - albeit not all - consider the latter to be a pleasant effect, and the former a sometimes disturbing effect.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

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    keithwms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    Just be aware that if you choose to soften at the print enlarging stage, you are effectively blurring the shadows (the projected light). This is a distinctly different effect than choosing to soften at the film exposure stage, where you are effectively softening the highlights (the imaging light). Most people - albeit not all - consider the latter to be a pleasant effect, and the former a sometimes disturbing effect.

    Ken
    So perhaps duping the neg would help.... or making a paper neg...
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    The image should have been made with a soft focus lens with soft light for best effect.
    A piece of panty hose stretched in an embroidery hoop is a great darkroom tool for minor diffusion.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

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    MattKing's Avatar
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    Matte surface paper helps.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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    If you print using the split-grade technique, dodging the face during the hard exposure may work. It's not something I've tried though, so I don't know for sure. My standard method is what's already been mentioned.

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    i was under the impression that the OP
    had the negative and was wondering how
    to print it ...
    soft light, wide open and back focusing can do wonders
    with any format and any lens ..

    the cellophane trick only works if you pass it through
    the beam of enlarger light with a certain amount of speed ...

  9. #9
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    i was under the impression that the OP
    had the negative and was wondering how
    to print it ...
    As was I, and just wanted to remind about the difference between bleeding shadows into highlights versus highlights into shadows when looking to tone down negative sharpness via diffusion during printing.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  10. #10

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    diffusing in the exposure
    or at the printing stage ...
    both have the potential of
    being "disturbing" or "pleasing"
    it depends on how heavy handed
    or how skilled the photographer / printer is...

    the problem is that many people
    go overboard one way or the other ...
    Last edited by jnanian; 11-21-2010 at 11:44 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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