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  1. #11
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    I'm a bit backwards compared to the rest of the world. I love 35mm for the gritty, big grained look you can get out of it.......Tri-X and Rodinal then lith printed. I shoot larger formats I shoot Acros to get fine grain and wonderful mid-tones. Either one can look great printed big, although I don't go past about 12x18 on 16x20 paper simply because my my trays aren't any bigger!

  2. #12
    hpulley's Avatar
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    I love Delta 100 35mm printed on 11x14" and if I had a bigger easel and trays I bet 16x20" would look good too, maybe more. It is very sharp and the grain is quite small so there is lots of detail and good tonality as well.

    It's about viewing distance too, Delta 3200 on 8x10 has obvious grain when held up to your face but on a wall or a desk the grain melts into the background. At the same time I find grain pleasing in the right shots so sometimes a nice big gritty enlargement is just what you need.
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

    Happiness is...

  3. #13

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    I should have mentioned in my previous post that I love grain...

  4. #14
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    I consider 5x7.5 inches to be my maximum. These are miniature negatives, after all. My normal is 2x to 4x magnifications, with only 35mm exceeding that. By that standard nothing smaller than 4x5 negatives may be used for 16x20 inch prints. But then, I love the look of 8x10 contact prints.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  5. #15
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    You need to name your evaluation criteria for a print in order to get a meaningful answer. Any piece of film can be blown up as large as is physically possible with ones darkroom equipment.

    My standard sizes for prints from 35mm (in inches) are 6x9 and 8x12. I also do 10x15, 12x18, and 4x6 sometimes. (2x3 is fun too, but a P.I.T.A. I really like the cute 2x3 speed easels. ) However, my standard print sizes have nothing to do with "image quality." They have to do with the size of prints that I want for the picture at hand. If "image quality" is really an important part of what I am after with a picture, I don't even consider using 35mm.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 11-23-2010 at 02:17 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  6. #16
    Jerevan's Avatar
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    I've always heard that you can't enlarge a 35mm negative more than 5x7" and you need at least a 8x10" camera to do anything decent. So I've felt a bit adventurous going over 5x7" in size whenever I printed my own things. Until I saw a friends' 30x40 cm prints (that's 12x16") and saw that the images didn't fall apart or make a good image a less good. It made it different. So basically, I think that the process and the subject has to somehow "fit" the size. And it is up to you to find the process that fits a subject in a certain size.
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  7. #17

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    Seems to me to be entirely subjective. The bigger the print, the further away you must stand.

    The big issue here is really the tendency to judge under circumstances that are often ridiculous. High magnification loupes, 100% enlargements on computer screens, even microscopes as I read in a thread here recently. Imagine how ludicrous it would be for me to judge a Picasso using a 12x loupe. Perhaps I should record my wife playing piano and then use software to examine each note for clarity. Examined under a microscope, that Shakespeare sonnet shows signs of softness that indicate his quill was not of the best quality, in future he should use an arm rest to maximise stability.
    Steve.

  8. #18
    hpulley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by perkeleellinen View Post
    Seems to me to be entirely subjective. The bigger the print, the further away you must stand.

    The big issue here is really the tendency to judge under circumstances that are often ridiculous. High magnification loupes, 100% enlargements on computer screens, even microscopes as I read in a thread here recently. Imagine how ludicrous it would be for me to judge a Picasso using a 12x loupe. Perhaps I should record my wife playing piano and then use software to examine each note for clarity...
    I agree completely on both the viewing distance and the use of AutoTune Plastic people with plastic voices, analog photography and analog music OK, I admit I like electronic music but not the AutoTune...
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

    Happiness is...

  9. #19
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    My typical size for 35mm is around 4x6" on an 8x10 sheet. I actually stopped 35mm after getting into 8x10 because the 10x to 20x images were so inferior in side-by-side comparision to 8x10 negatives enlarged 1.4x to 2x. However, after 'discovering' small printing, I'm doing more 35mm.

  10. #20

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    I often wonder if we could capture all the energy people use to focus upon technical aspects of photography: sharpness, grain, tonality. If we captured this energy and diverted into artistic aspects such as mood, feeling, perhaps even the central message of the picture. I wonder what type of photography would be the outcome.
    Steve.

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