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  1. #21
    Curt's Avatar
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    "LEISURE"

    What is this life if, full of care,
    We have no time to stand and stare.

    No time to stand beneath the boughs
    And stare as long as sheep or cows.

    No time to see, when woods we pass,
    Where squirrels hide their nuts in grass.

    No time to see, in broad daylight,
    Streams full of stars, like skies at night.

    No time to turn at Beauty's glance,
    And watch her feet, how they can dance.

    No time to wait till her mouth can
    Enrich that smile her eyes began.

    A poor life this if, full of care,
    We have no time to stand and stare.
    It's taking the time to look and see the light and its effect on what you see. You must master the materials you have to the fullest extent possible. That's seeing and technique. Lots of "looking" does not equate to "seeing". Looking is pedestrian, seeing is perception.

    How do the masters do what they do? How do they choose what they photography and how do they do it? Two masters standing side by side photograph differently so it's an individual way of seeing. There isn't a school of duplicate seeing, sure you can take a course with a master but you will never be that person.

    If you want to be a better photographer then travel and study. Do other things like drawing, painting, writing, listening to different types of music.

    Curt
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  2. #22
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Curt

    Very well said!

    Who is this quote by?
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  3. #23

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    I agree with Ralph.

    There's nothing wrong with wanting the best tools and techniques that we can find for creating our photographs -- cameras, lenses, films, developers, papers, etc. There is no denying that each of these components to the process can contribute to the quality of the final result.

    But with all the attention that we pay to those technical components, we sometimes forget that photography is really about light. I'm convinced that you can make more progress towards making an excellent photograph by thinking about subject lighting than you can by tinkering with all those other post-exposure components combined.

    If you really want a glowing photograph, you have to figure out how to place your subject in a glowing light.

    Regards,

    Dave

  4. #24
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    Dave has hit on part of what I think contributes to a glowing photograph.
    Light is the key as well as the amount of light on lays down on the print

    but I do think it all revolves around the whole motion of making an image , start to finish.

    I was always taught about the circle of photography, starting with an idea, the exposing film in the right light, placing a good development for that light and film and subject matter, then with good contacts finding the range of the negative, from there a proof or working print to see the image, and try it with different papers or process, then making a full print that conveys ones idea of how that image is to look, Using darkroom methods like dodge and burn, split filter contrast control, then good toning to bring out subtle nuances , proper presentation in a matt , then a complimentary frame for the image, and finally hanging it in good light.

    If you follow all these steps and done each stage to your best ability, I think all your prints will glow.
    it is a recipe of many , many steps from beginning to end that matters, and not one single element. By understanding each step**which may take thousand's of prints by the way** you build upon your last step.
    All the small details are just steps one does to convey the image the way they want.
    As a professional printer I can say the worst prints I make are the ones that I do not know the photographers project , and not completely and fully understand what type of prints they are looking for. As well their film could be store bought
    process which does not consider the lighting conditions rather volume process in one fits all dev and lets see what happens.
    When I work with a person over many years, we tend to get prints that glow, because all of the above details are discussed and looked for before we go to final exhibition print.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martiny View Post
    I agree with Ralph.

    There's nothing wrong with wanting the best tools and techniques that we can find for creating our photographs -- cameras, lenses, films, developers, papers, etc. There is no denying that each of these components to the process can contribute to the quality of the final result.

    But with all the attention that we pay to those technical components, we sometimes forget that photography is really about light. I'm convinced that you can make more progress towards making an excellent photograph by thinking about subject lighting than you can by tinkering with all those other post-exposure components combined.

    If you really want a glowing photograph, you have to figure out how to place your subject in a glowing light.

    Regards,

    Dave

  5. #25

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    Just to interject another thought. "Glowing" is one style of photographic prints which I generally try to achieve but I have seen many spectacular prints by masters such as Paul Strand, Irving Penn and Edward Weston when done with platinum that did not "glow". So I would not say that to be masterful print it would have to glow. There are many ways of expression with each one being pleasing to some.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com

  6. #26

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    I agree, jeffreyg, not all masterful prints has to glow. But my curiosity started when photographs that I like has this brilliance that almost appear back-lit when I fully know B&W photograph is a reflective medium. It seemed to do something that is physically impossible (to glow).

    I'm happy to report, I've been in e-mail conversation with someone from APUG. Through his help and from this thread and my newly acquired "Way Beyond" book, I was able to achieve some glow/pop/sparkle in my print. What it took was to carefully control contrast and print density and do so in smaller areas. That is - not to treat a page of print as whole and apply one exposure and contrast to overall print then fix some, but mask/cover/dodge/burn in smaller sections and assemble the whole print. It was one heck of a busy printing session! (I used masking and split grade printing combined with manual tool dodging) My result is FAR from masterful art but it is much better than my straight print.

    Thanks all!
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  7. #27
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    tkamiya

    Sounds like you're on the road to success. I always treat the image as the interaction of several areas that need individual treatment. Yes, it's laborious, but there is no shortcut to a fine print.
    Last edited by RalphLambrecht; 12-20-2010 at 10:21 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  8. #28
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    I too can relate to the OP curiosity of "glowing" in a print. I believe as has been said, that it is the combination of overall contrast and local contrast. The highlights have to be just the right density and the print hung in appropriate lighting. I disagree however that lighting in the original scene contributes everything to the final "glow" in the print. Prints with glow can be made from negatives shot in even the worst of lighting conditions, as long as the negative is exposed and developed correctly.

  9. #29

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    I wish I could offer some advise on how to create "glowing prints". However, if you have not checked out Aubrey Bodine's prints, it is well worthwhile doing so. I gather he did alot of bleaching and toning (with a fair amount of toxic materials from what I have read). Nonetheless, some of his prints are absolutely luminous.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    Curt

    Very well said!

    Who is this quote by?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W._H._Davies

    William Henry Davies who also wrote a book called The Autobiography of a Super-tramp, later a rock and roll band used the name Super-tramp but it was his term and the title of his book.

    I learned so much from reading the book that it has stuck with me all these years. When I'm out for a walk I often recite the poem Leisure to myself. It's one of a few that I have memorized.

    Curt
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

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