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  1. #11
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by frotog View Post
    How on earth did you get your exposure plane parallel to your film plane?
    My question exactly.

    And probably the answer is one of those "DUH! Why didn't I think of that" solutions.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  2. #12
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    Wow, great account of a fascinating project. Thank you for saying something and then doing it and then sharing it on APUG. This is what it's all about.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by frotog View Post
    How on earth did you get your exposure plane parallel to your film plane?
    Patience, binoculars, bubble level and following the floor tiles.

    Quote Originally Posted by frotog View Post
    Your drying set up intrigues me. How flat did the print dry? A large wet piece of fiber-based paper shrinks considerably, oftentimes pulling tacks loose. Was this a problem with your hanging dowel rod?
    The prints curled on the long edges, but not too much. They did not twist or do weird stuff. I pinned them a bit loose (letting the edge make a very slight bow, not a straight line between two pins) to compensate for shrinking. They ripped just a little bit, not severely.
    Of course, in order to be displayed properly they need to be mounted. I thought about pinning the wet paper on a 10mm plywood board with back ribs, folding the paper around the edges like a canvas, and let it stretch dry. But keeping it clean would be hell.
    SoFiET
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  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by gattu marrudu View Post
    Patience, binoculars, bubble level and following the floor tiles.

    Crazy! A carpenter's laser might have shaved a few hours off this part of your process (but I would not want to deny you your love-labor).

    I bet the center is sharp but how did your 28mm lens perform around the edges of the print? From a 16mm neg. that lil' pup is optimized for a 5x7 print (inches, not feet). And at wide open your stuff has got to be flatter than flat. Did you sandwich the neg in glass? Tape and stretch the paper on all four sides? In any event, you deserve a medal for your persistance.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelbsc View Post
    My question exactly.

    And probably the answer is one of those "DUH! Why didn't I think of that" solutions.
    Tiles, binoculars and patience? More like "Far-out! I wouldn't have done it that way but it's impressive that someone did". Darkroom technique bordering on process art.

  6. #16
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    With very high magnification like this, as you near 'infinity focus' your projection paper can be skewed to a large degree and still be in focus. Just imagine taking a picture of the wall with a Minox or Minolta 16 from where the enlarger is. The optics are exactly the same.

  7. #17

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    ic-racer, I guess you are right. It's not the enlarging plane that should be perfectly flat, but the negative. That is easy with a glass carrier.
    And, about laser levels, it's just that I don't have enough experience with them, and prices in Italy for any reliable model are outrageous.
    SoFiET
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  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    With very high magnification like this, as you near 'infinity focus' your projection paper can be skewed to a large degree and still be in focus. Just imagine taking a picture of the wall with a Minox or Minolta 16 from where the enlarger is. The optics are exactly the same.
    In theory yes, but in practice - not in my experience, especially at f2.8 and over 40x. A print this large will show soft grain whereas you might not notice with an 8x10. I used to enlarge on a five foot wide sheet of 3/4" plywood that doubled as a shelf. Eventually a slight sag set in, enough to throw the corners out of focus. By slight I mean a deflection of less than 1/2" across the 6 - 1/2' length of board. Problem was remedied when I got a very rigid sheet of aluminum panel. Granted that the problem was most apparent when using a 50mm lens and the distance to paper (about 9') was probably nowhere near infinity focus. Of course this would not be an issue at f11 but then, as Gattu discovered, the depth of field compromises sharpness of focus to a considerable degree, even with a rodenstock G lens.

  9. #19
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    I'm sure I'm not the first or last to say this, good work!
    - Derek
    [ Insert meaningless camera listing here ]

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