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  1. #1
    yeknom02's Avatar
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    A Completely Idiotic Question

    I have a Beseler 23 enlarger with two lens boards for Beslar 50mm and Beslar 75 mm lenses. I'm thinking about upgrading one or both to something fancy, like a Rodenstock or Schneider lens.

    Can I use the same boards for the new lens(es)?
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST
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  2. #2
    23mjm's Avatar
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    Yes normally

  3. #3
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yeknom02 View Post
    I have a Beseler 23 enlarger with two lens boards for Beslar 50mm and Beslar 75 mm lenses. I'm thinking about upgrading one or both to something fancy, like a Rodenstock or Schneider lens.

    Can I use the same boards for the new lens(es)?
    Most likely, yes.

    Some lenses require different boards, because their thread sizes are different.

    And some longer or shorter lenses can, for some enlargers, require cones or recessed lensboards.

    But if your current lenses have 39mm threads, and you are looking to replace them with upgraded 50mm and 80mm lenses, many if not most of the better versions will use the same boards and retaining rings or threads.

    You probably won't be able to find an upgraded 75mm - for some reason most of those are of the entry level variety.

    You may want to consider something longer, like 90mm, if you think you may shoot 6x7. 90mm will be fine for most 6x6 or 6x4.5 negatives, especially if you have the long column version of your enlarger (longer lenses mean smaller enlargements with the same height).

    By the way, there is nothing idiotic about the question - it is a good one to ask, if you don't know the answer.

    One final practical point - be sure that you can actually get your current lenses off the boards they are installed on. If they have been there for a long time, they can sometimes really resist change .

    Have fun!
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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    Yes except for a few oddball lenses. You want ones with 39mm threads, sometimes called LTM or Leica mount.

    Ditto on the 80 or 90mm lenses. You probably wont find many 75s that are a step up from what you got. I actually have a 75 that was acquired for a couple bucks because I needed the Beseler lens board that was attached to it

  5. #5
    yeknom02's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the advice! I had planned on getting an 80mm lens anyway, since I shoot 6x6. I don't really think I'll ever shoot 6x7, since I had borrowed a Mamiya RB and decided I didn't like the weight of the camera or the extra space of the larger negative.
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST
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  6. #6
    23mjm's Avatar
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    An 80mm Nikon covers 6X7 fine as do a lot of others.

  7. #7
    yeknom02's Avatar
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    Speaking of idiotic questions about enlarger lenses, I noticed that one of my Beseler lens boards has a small, clear plastic cylinder with a 45-degree cut at the end. Does anyone have any idea what this is, and what it's for?
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST
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  8. #8
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yeknom02 View Post
    Speaking of idiotic questions about enlarger lenses, I noticed that one of my Beseler lens boards has a small, clear plastic cylinder with a 45-degree cut at the end. Does anyone have any idea what this is, and what it's for?
    When positioned correctly, the cylinder illuminates the f/stop setting on some enlarging lenses.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #9
    yeknom02's Avatar
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    Wow, thanks, Matt. I'm going to see if I can adjust this. I was just thinking of how cool it would be to see my f/stops when I'm printing!
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST
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  10. #10
    MattKing's Avatar
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    If you are looking for new lenses, many of the modern lenses feature illuminated f/stops.

    I consider them a real plus.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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