Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,681   Posts: 1,482,192   Online: 1058
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 26
  1. #11

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Valley Stream, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,216
    That's exactly the technique I stumbled upon years ago. My palette is an old white ceramic saucer from a long gone set of dishes. I just keep a spot of each color of Spotone around the perimeter and use the center section for blending. Works a treat. Glad you shared it.
    Frank Schifano

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    15,260
    Blog Entries
    2
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by fschifano View Post
    That's exactly the technique I stumbled upon years ago. My palette is an old white ceramic saucer from a long gone set of dishes. I just keep a spot of each color of Spotone around the perimeter and use the center section for blending. Works a treat. Glad you shared it.
    that is what i used to use, and or the back of an rc print ...

  3. #13
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,409
    It's much better to use spit from your mouth to dilute the spotting medium than water, because it's thicker and less liable to run.
    Ben

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Berkeley, CA
    Posts
    61
    Good ideas above! A technique I came up with when I began to have difficulty spotting because of not being able to focus on things as close as I could in my youth is to use clip-ons over my glasses that provide sharp focus at 8" and use a high intensity lamp. I place the lamp about a foot from the brush tip at about a two-o'clock position with the lamp head about a foot above the table surface. This casts a very sharp shadow of the brush. As I move the brush toward the print the brush tip and its shadow converge, coming together just as the brush tip meets the print. My accuracy is greatly improved with this method. Also, I use a trick I learned decades ago: having the image upside down makes you read what you see as areas of various gray tones rather than as faces, buildings, trees, etc.

  5. #15
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Ipswich, Massachusetts, USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    4,520
    Images
    26
    "Spotting fluid"??? What means this "spotting fluid"? Doesn't everyone use run-of-the-mill water colors?
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,025
    I do this too. Its great for getting concentrated ink on the end for dark areas as the pigment is more concentrated than when straight out of the bottle.

  7. #17
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    Same way I was taught to do it. It works much better than the alternative IMO. You can also set up a line of different tones on the palette by using different dilutions.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Cardigan, West Wales
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    90
    I have recently been using a solid block of ink that I bought from an art shop - it was in a calligraphy cabinet display and only £2.15. I load the brush with water, pick up some ink with it and create a smear of dark to light tones on a plastic sheet, (will start using the CD jewel case soon). As it dries I further draw out the ink to the right shade on the reverse of a print paper and spot as it is just damp enough to transfer. For some reason I have found this block of ink to be better than any wet medium using the same method, as it 'magically' blends into the paper: the surface trace is invisible at all but the most acutely lit angle. I'll be sticking with this and it will probably see me out.
    Mark Walker.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Boone, North Carolina, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    166
    If you do not want to lick the brush, you can dampen it on a sponge.

  10. #20
    Bill Burk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    2,909
    Images
    46
    Hi Tkamiya,

    You have found something very useful.

    I do something very similar. I make puddles of different dilutions of spotting fluid in a cheap plastic six-pocket palette.

    I dip a brush in the puddle and make a dotted spiral, hopefully using up the whole puddle and leaving a spattering of dots to dry up.

    When they are all dry, then I have a series of dry dots, each about a brushful. I'll wet the brush with water, draw it across a dry spot, and then draw on a scratch of test-strip... Then I go hunting for spots to fill in on the print with that tone.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin