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  1. #1

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    I found a good spotting technique - accidentally....

    I have been practicing spotting for a while and today, I accidentally found a good method that works for me. Thought I'd share....

    When a drop of spot ink is left in a palette too long, it dries up. This dried up spot is an amazingly easy way to pick up just the right amount of ink. First, slightly wet the brush and touch the dried up ink. Touch few more times to pick up more ink. Then lightly brush the tip on scrap piece of paper until the darkness is just right.

    Because the brush doesn't "suck up" the liquid ink, the amount it picks up is very small and easily controllable.

    I thought I'd share...
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  2. #2
    pinhole_dreamer's Avatar
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    I work with resin dolls. That's exactly how I paint the details on their faces...only using watercolors instead. You're right. It's perfect.
    I love the smell of fixer in the morning...It smells like...PHOTOGRAPHY!

    The photo blog has moved...
    I Love Film : by Susan McNutt, the mad photographer

  3. #3
    Dave Swinnard's Avatar
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    That's how I was taught to do it. The "slightly wet" on the brush was usually a quick lick of the brush. Perhaps not the most sound approach, but I don't spot too many prints these days and I'll blame the various aches and pains on age rather than Spotone.

    I do not teach the lick the brush method though. A drop or two of water and a piece of toilet paper or tissue to suck the "wet" out of the brush.

    The fellow I learned from always told me I wanted a brush with "one wet and a couple of dries" on it.

  4. #4
    ann
    ann is offline

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    used this method for years, still have a palette with dry ink sitting around some place.
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

  5. #5

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    So.... this isn't anything new....... Yay! I reinvented a wheel!! Weeeeeee....!
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  6. #6
    Dave Swinnard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ann View Post
    used this method for years, still have a palette with dry ink sitting around some place.
    This reminds me...a old CD-ROM case with a clear cover and a white back-piece makes a great palette for holding and mixing and keeping the dust off of the dried spotting colours. A different shade in each corner with the blended colours spotted around makes a useful tool.

  7. #7

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    To tkamiya, well done, despite what others say there is great satisfaction in finding out for yourself, regardless of wether it is common practice.
    Thanks Dave Swinnard for a very useful tip.
    Regards, Mark Walker.

  8. #8
    Monophoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    When a drop of spot ink is left in a palette too long, it dries up. This dried up spot is an amazingly easy way to pick up just the right amount of ink. First, slightly wet the brush and touch the dried up ink. Touch few more times to pick up more ink. Then lightly brush the tip on scrap piece of paper until the darkness is just right.
    David Vestal taught this trick in workshops many years ago. I first became aware of it in a workshop with him in 1990.

    In addition to being easier, it makes a bottle of spotting fluid last forever. Vestal used a porcelain saucer as his pallatte; I use a white plastic makeup container (it has a built-in cover).

    After letting a few drops of fluid dry on the pallatte, use a damp brush to pick up a bit, and then make a smear on the pallatte. After the smear dries, it becomes a reservoir of spotting dye that is thinner, and therefore lighter in color.
    Louie

  9. #9
    Valerie's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tip, tkamiya. And you too, Dave--CD case is a great idea. Teaching spotting is on the calendar for my students next week and this will be great info to share.
    "So I am turning over a new leaf but the page is stuck". Diane Arbus

  10. #10
    ruilourosa's Avatar
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    hello

    a good method is to use inkjet leftover black, grey, light grey inks of my school epson printer with ultrachrome inks (supposedelly good archival properties). Goes well into paper, good choice of colors water based...

    sometimes i also use a bit of colour to make some effects


    Cheers
    vive la resistance!

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