Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,849   Posts: 1,582,844   Online: 716
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 27 of 27
  1. #21
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Toronto-Ontario
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    4,706
    Images
    14
    Micheal

    As Joe and others have said, try split contrast printing.

    I would use a middle filter that gives you good highlight detail, As Joe suggests I would dodge during the initial exposure to open up the shawdows, you can dodge with a 5 filter which will help as well.

    When you have the right combination , of highlight and shawdow detail , you may still be lacking the black you are looking for.

    At this point put the 5 filter in the head and give a blast of high grade, dodge at this stage as well. Only the deep blacks will come in without screwing up your highlight detail.
    This may take a few sheets of paper to get what you want, I know what those negatives with long exposures are like but you will be able to pull a print that has believable blacks and good highlight

  2. #22
    JackRosa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Oklahoma, USA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    370
    Images
    8

    Condiering reciprocity?

    Quote Originally Posted by Poco
    Christian,

    The negative which prompted my question required a 3 1/2 hour exposure @ f11.5. What would have been sufficient to "juice" the shadows ...6 hrs? ...10 hrs? I needed the fstop for DOF, so opening up wasn't an option.

    The point is, we're a diverse group here with diverse shooting styles and, sometimes, specialized technical needs. Not everyone is out there shooting decently lit landscapes.

    -Michael
    Are you taking into account reciprocity failure at such long exposures? If you are not adjusting exposure and development to compensate for reciprocity failure, you are -for sure - under-exposing your negatives and there is little you can do in the darkroom to obtain a print whose shadows have luminosity.
    Jack Rosa

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,652
    A couple of suggestions from a novice at low-light photography:
    1) use film that has minimal reciprocity failure ( eg., T-Max 400, Delta 100 or even Efke 25 which seems to do well on long exposures).
    2) Fred Picker said expose for the highlights & the blacks will fall on the straight line thereby giving better separation. Have been reading Fred's newsletters (borrowed from a friend); and they offer some very good but unconventional ideas/techniques.
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    653
    Bob, Jack, Doug...

    Thanks. The truth is, this is a three month old thread and I've gotten fairly decent results since I first posed the question with careful split grade printing. I don't really know why this thread suddenly sprung back to life.

    I also agree that a film with better reciprocity characteristics would probably be better for my kind of photography. Finding one and learning to use it may be a decent winter project.

  5. #25
    noseoil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Tucson
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,898
    Images
    17
    Efke 25 does have excellent reciprocity characteristics. I did a dimly lit scene yesterday and used Sandy's Pyrocat-hd for the first time. There is a HUGE difference in shadow values when compared to PMK. It was only a 2 minute 30 second exposure, but it worked out well enough to convince me that PMK isn't as good at shadow rendition. Give this combination a try, it is worth investigating. tim

  6. #26
    Dan
    Dan is offline

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    8
    David,

    I find the KRST an interesting option. Can you elaborate on this technique for the shadows? How long do you leave the solution on the shadows? Is there an after wash/treatment involved?

    Thanks.

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wi
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    3,242

    maximum black

    I am very much of the opinion that a print rarely needs to show the maximum black that the paper can produce. Rather I believe that the blacks should be no darker than is necessary to convey the spirit of the photographer's intentions.

    Many time photography is compared to music. Would you fault a piano piece simple because it did not use all of the bass notes or would you listen and respond?

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin