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  1. #11

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    okey, i will try it out this week!
    i will put up some results here if i have some

  2. #12
    MattKing's Avatar
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    It may be that this is simpler than the posters above indicate.

    It looks to me like the sprocket holes at the bottom are exposed in the way that one would expect from a filed out carrier. The top sprocket holes are different, but look somewhat similar to the effect I get when I print full frame with an Omega D series carrier. The edges of the images in those full frame prints are partially distinct - made up partly (I think) of flare from the edge of the carrier and partly from light transmitted/diffracted at the very edge of the negative/carrier interface.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Linopacino View Post
    i have a few negative carriers and a i grind it a little bit on the edges and corners, but didnt got that result.

    is there another solution to get this frames?
    You did not file enough. You have to whack it out pretty good. When you print, don't let the easel blades frame the picture. Let the edges of the negative carrier opening frame the picture.

    I think this is the best presentation for 35mm because it is something that cannot be done in photoshop.

  4. #14
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    The upper sprocket holes are clear, like the original negative would be. Direct printing through the clear rebate gets you black on paper. To print a clear rebate you need an intermediate positive.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  5. #15
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    The upper sprocket holes are clear, like the original negative would be. Direct printing through the clear rebate gets you black on paper. To print a clear rebate you need an intermediate positive.
    Mark:

    Here is an example of a cropped corner of a scanned proof print which I think shows what I was posting about above. The print is full frame out to the edge of the carrier. See how the (bottom right corner) image in the negative bleeds in a faint way into the edge. It looks almost like a ghost image.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails corner1a.jpg  
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #16
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Mark:

    Here is an example of a cropped corner of a scanned proof print which I think shows what I was posting about above. The print is full frame out to the edge of the carrier. See how the (bottom right corner) image in the negative bleeds in a faint way into the edge. It looks almost like a ghost image.
    I've seen that in MF negs regularly, not so much in 35mm.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  7. #17
    ann
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    beseler has a negative carrier for full frame printing for 35mm film, along with the standard carrier.

    This technique was the rage in the 70's and then fill out of favor, and then came back and then; well like other things it comes around every so often.

    I think it works great for some images not so well for others. Just a personal opinion, as some Hate it.
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

  8. #18
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    As others already sad: file the negative carier. Here is another example from my meopta axomat:

    http://darkosaric.deviantart.com/art...-170-205649119

    regards,

  9. #19
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    I would say if this is done analogue then borders could be developed on a sheet of glass with whatever materials you wanted, contact printed, and then photographed on lith film or high contract film. The result would be different boarder negatives to print before the image that could also be scaled up or down to fit the desired size. I think Bartlett popularized this technique.
    Chris Saganich
    http://www.imagebrooklyn.com

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