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Thread: Contamination?

  1. #11
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anthony J. Martinez View Post
    A minute.
    Anthony

    Development will not necessarily reach Dmax after just one minute (see attached graph). Try to double your development time to 120 s, including the drop-off time, to get consistency and full blacks.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails FactorialDev1.jpg  
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    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  2. #12
    ozphoto's Avatar
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    I agree with Ralph - I develop for 2 mins and consistently get nice deep blacks with my developer of choice.

    Note if your developer is on the cold side, you'll need longer to achieve the same. My processing temp is 68F/20C, +/-1C. (Sorry don't know that figure in F.)

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    Anthony

    Development will not necessarily reach Dmax after just one minute (see attached graph). Try to double your development time to 120 s, including the drop-off time, to get consistency and full blacks.
    Thanks, I was just going off what the little sheet of paper in the paper box said. That graph is very useful. My inner engineering student likes tables and graphs. I will extend my time in the developer and see where that takes me.

  4. #14

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    Thank you fine folks for showing me the way. I finally got back in the darkroom to reprint the photo. A full two minutes in the developer definitely made a difference.


    Self, dark. Again by Anthony J. Martinez, on Flickr

  5. #15
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    So much for manufacture instruction sheets. If you like to get your highlights back, reduce the exposure but stick to the two-minute development.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  6. #16

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    Initially I stuck to the same exposure time/aperture and the only change was my development time, that eliminated the streaking in the corner and made the darks notably darker but it still wasn't quite black. I ended up having to increase exposure a bit to get to pure black, but that obviously brought the highlights down as well. I would like a bit more range, so I'll probably be printing this again once I have the enlarging lamp automated so I can dodge my face a bit.

  7. #17
    Marco B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anthony J. Martinez View Post
    I ended up having to increase exposure a bit to get to pure black, but that obviously brought the highlights down as well. I would like a bit more range, so I'll probably be printing this again once I have the enlarging lamp automated so I can dodge my face a bit.
    Instead of trying to dodge, you should first try increasing your contrast by using contrast filters.

    Contrast filters come in half grades, going from 0 (or 00) = softest to 5 = hardest contrast and 2 = about "standard" contrast with a normally developed film. Do you have them?

    If you have a condenser enlarger, there should be a small filter drawer where you can insert them. Ilford sells appropriate Multigrade filters for this purpose. If you don't use filters, the standard lamp usually gives about a standard contrast grade of 2. The only way to change this single fixed value is to use filters with your condenser head..

    For color or B&W multigrade heads, you need to change the settings of the build in filters either using the CMY dials (color head), or settings on the controller of the B&W multigrade head. Just use a filter setting with a harder contrast grade (so above 2), and see what results you get.
    My website

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    I do have sets of contrast filters, but they're at least a decade old and I'm not sure they're terribly useful anymore. Though I have no idea what they are supposed to look like there are two sets (both Ilford Multigrade) in two different sizes and the coloration of these filters is nowhere near the same for the same number in either set. Should the filters at least be a single solid color from edge to edge, because several of these seem to graduate to clear as they go out from the center. They spent a long time in a central Texas outdoor storage unit, and while I have no idea what they're supposed to look like I suspect that wasn't kind to them.

  9. #19
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    They should be some pinky color for Ilford Multigrade filters, as you suspected as a single solid color across the filter surface. Each grade has a different color, going from very light to dark for grades 0 to 5.

    Silverprint has two versions for sale. One set for below the lens if you don't have a suitable filter drawer, and one set of "normal" sheet style filters for insertion in a filter drawer. You most likely need the latter:

    http://www.silverprint.co.uk/Product...asp?PrGrp=1089

    You definitely should buy a set, you can't properly work without them on modern Multigrade papers. Once you have them, you will be amazed what you can do to change contrast of these modern Multigrade papers, it's very effective.
    Last edited by Marco B; 05-21-2011 at 05:22 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    My website

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    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

    "Analog is chemistry + physics, digital is physics + math, which ones did you like most?"

  10. #20
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    Marco is right. You may need more contrast. I'm an advocate of finding the right exposure for the highlights and then finding the contrast for the shadows. Try your filters, they are pretty resilient. Mine are 30 years old (stored in the dark at 70F) and work just fine.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

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