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  1. #1
    Rom
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    Dear all,

    I cannot spend too much money and I am looking for a way to glue some of my prints on a canvas.

    It s a FB paper. I have seen some spray glue, like the tetenal. Are they good and easy to use ?

    I would like to find something that I can realise at home with common tool that I can afford or find it easily..


    Any advices are welcome as I am a newby in that step.

    Thanks

    Cheers
    All the best,
    Rom
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  2. #2

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    Consider PVA (polyvinyl acetate). I have used it to bind a book including gluing fabric to archival board. You should be able to find it in an art supply and it is neutral ph.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  3. #3

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    I forgot to add that it would be permanent. I think anything used that will release will alter the surface of the canvas and paper because of the textures involved

  4. #4
    ann
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    sprays are not good for you are the environment.

    If the print isn't too large, you can dry mount it with an iron, some kraft paper, and of course the proper backboard and mounting tissues.
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

  5. #5

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    hi rom

    you can make a simple archival wheat paste by heating water and flour ( farine ) together
    i haven't made any in a while but i believe it is 1 part flour 2 parts water ...
    there are variations of this recipe that say 2.4 dl water + 45ml of flour
    either way, you add / stir the flour into boiling water &C and let it cool
    wheat paste is archival and holds pretty well ...
    when pasting a print to canvas spread the paste on the canvas or print
    put waxed paper ontop of the print and under the canvas ( waxed paper won't stick )
    and put a piece of board or something larger than the print over the print ...
    then put books or stones or something heavy on top of it ...
    you have to be careful because the paper and the canvas will dry out at different times
    so do a few tests with scraps of paper and canvas before you do your finished print.

    when the time comes that you want to remove the print from the canvas, just put in water
    and the paste will release ...

    have fun !
    john

  6. #6
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    As Mr. Nanian noted, wallpaper paste (wheat paste) is a standard mounting method. Wallpaper paste has a fungicide in it so the paste won't support mold.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  7. #7

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    things that dry at different rates can be tricky ...
    its best to brush from the center out to the edges when you coat your materials
    i used to wait for the paper
    to curl a little to know it was "dry enough " to paste the rest down,
    and then use the heal of your palm to push the paper onto the receiving
    sheet again from the center out to the edges ... this gets the air bubbles out
    ( and its kind of fun too )

    the zeier- book ( books boxes and portfolios )
    http://www.amazon.com/Books-Boxes-Po.../dp/0830634835
    gives great step by step instructions
    for making stuff out of paper and board, and these methods can easily be transfered
    to other materials ...

    good luck !
    john

  8. #8

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    Wet mounting will curl the mount toward the print as it drys. The solution is a scrap print on the back side. This normally is done on large panel prints.

    Best to dry prints flat and use a linen tape hinge or dry mount.

  9. #9
    Rick A's Avatar
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    I found a product called "Photo Glue Stick" , it's acid free and designed to be used for photos only. It's marketed by Pioneer Photo Albums Inc., comes in a yellow tube that rsembles a giant chap stick. I buy mine at the local hardware.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  10. #10

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    Wet mounting takes some practice. Don't try it on your best print. A good art store paste is Yes glue,
    if it is slightly diluted. But the best commercial adhesive are Seal VacuMount and the glue made by
    Daige for their automatic wet coaters. The best applicator is a closed-cell foam miniature "hotdog"
    roller and frame from the paint store. You need to work quickly, before the glue starts drying. Big
    prints are challenging, because you have to be extemely careful, after attaching a leading edge, to
    gradually lower the print while using a hard wallpaper brayer or formica roller to work it down.
    Afterwards you place a flat weight over the whole thing until the glue dries. Countermounting is generally recommended unless the canvas is stretched quite tight first on a frame. Spray adhesives
    are quite unhealthy to worth with, generally fail for anything but small prints, and aren't particularly
    archival. Wet mounting is very economical, archival, and simple in principle, but tricky to learn to
    do correctly, esp with large prints. You also need a room humidity level low enough for the glue to
    fully dry, but not so low or hot as to get the glue to set prematurely.

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