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  1. #51
    clayne's Avatar
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    Bob Carnie should also have some ideas on the best approaches here.

    You have to remember that mural printing, even within the realm of professional printing, is still far off the bell curve.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  2. #52

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    Correct. HP is the distributor. A new Rodagon G lens would be fairly expensive, and used ones are not common. They are a specialty lens only
    for big enlargements, and not really suitable for ordinary work. Some lab
    owners preferred Apo-Nikkor process lenses for this kind of thing, but I
    don't belive they were ever made in shorter focal lengths ideal for med
    format work, and would be about two stops slower in actual use, so need
    a stronger light source (which specialty labs had). I had a big color mural
    enlarger once, and the damn thing doubled my utility bills.

  3. #53
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    Well I just won an ebay auction last night for a Rodenstock 75mm f/4.5 Rogonar-S. It's a 4-element design. As I mentioned earlier I'm planning to print 16x20 from 6x4.5 and 6x6 negatives with it. It was such a bargain that I couldn't resist. Now I'm reading reviews on this lens and I'm reading that it is a great lens, but not for great enlargement, as the corners lose sharpness. Would 16x20 constitute as great enlargement? Like I said, it was such a deal that if it doesn't work well for it I'll just get rid of it. I'll still keep my eyes open for a Componon-S 80/4.

    Sometimes it pays to just stay off the internet. Haha.

  4. #54
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    I am currently using -Apo Rodagon 90mm f1:4mm for all medium - 50 mm -n f2.8 for 35mm - Apo Rodagon n 1:4 f 150mm for 4x5

    I really like the coverage of the 90mm I have a bunch of 80mm Apo that I never use because of the two 90's.

    for murals laser align the neg stage to wall or baseboard,,, as well glass carriers,, as well mask out the neg,, as well get rid of any flare light.

  5. #55

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    Well, no laser alignment in my darkroom, just eyes, glass carrier, a 9x12 Durst B&W test neg and lots of patience. Never went larger than 36x50 inches, though. Absolutely mask out the negative and remove all flare light. Apo=expensive, except maybe 50mm or if you're really lucky. Recently a practically new G-Componon 105/5,6 came into my hands for 100 Euros. I guess G=affordable, Rodenstock or Schneider.

  6. #56

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    A laser alignment tool is an almost obligatory purchase for anyone looking for the best performance making enlargements. I paid $180 for mine and I think it represents the best value for money of any photographic item I have ever purchased. Everything I do culminates in a print and alignment is usually the weakest link in a darkroom set up. Spirit levels and tape don't come close to cutting it. The time it has saved is enormous and the stress and general irritation evaporated. If I want perfect crisp grain right out to the corner, as well as on centre, from any neg at any enlargement size, I can have it. Predictably. Every time. I am being serious when I say that if someone told me I could never buy or sell another item of photo kit and had to drop one that I already own, I would give up my 24 Summillux asph before the laser alignment tool.

  7. #57
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    I don't like using the dam thing but it is necessary in my darkroom. I do not leave it out of my site.
    I feel the same about glass carriers as well.

    I think these two items are more important than the difference one gets from APO and Non APO lenses.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Stanworth View Post
    A laser alignment tool is an almost obligatory purchase for anyone looking for the best performance making enlargements. I paid $180 for mine and I think it represents the best value for money of any photographic item I have ever purchased. Everything I do culminates in a print and alignment is usually the weakest link in a darkroom set up. Spirit levels and tape don't come close to cutting it. The time it has saved is enormous and the stress and general irritation evaporated. If I want perfect crisp grain right out to the corner, as well as on centre, from any neg at any enlargement size, I can have it. Predictably. Every time. I am being serious when I say that if someone told me I could never buy or sell another item of photo kit and had to drop one that I already own, I would give up my 24 Summillux asph before the laser alignment tool.

  8. #58
    clayne's Avatar
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    Which shows once again that prep is more important than materials. :-)
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  9. #59
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    Recently I did a quick test of a few 80mm enlarging lenses I have with a coarse grain panoramic negative (24x58mm) in a glass carrier with a laser aligned enlarger on 16x20" paper.
    Lenses were:
    Meopta Belar 4.5/75
    Meopta Meogon 4/80
    Componon 5.6/80
    Componon S 4/80
    Rodagon 4/80

    All enlargements are done at f8 (and f11 for componon 5.6) with the same MG filter. Exposure was monitored with Ilford EM10.
    Belar (4 element, "budget" lens) was very good in the centre, grain was soft in the corners
    Componon 5.6 (old, small one with 23.5mm thread) At f8 good centre, soft grain in corners, at f11 better/sharper grain in corners
    All other 3 lenses: Meogon, Rodagon and Componon S 4/80 were very, very similar performers at f8. I'm pretty sure that nobody can complain about prints made with any of those 3 lenses.
    On very close inspection Componon S had something extra, that touch of "micro contrast" by the very tight film grain and he was winner for me.
    Maybe there should be more difference between them if I tested them with a full (56x56mm) negative. But I need them for panoramic negatives!

    Goran

  10. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Stanworth View Post
    A laser alignment tool is an almost obligatory purchase for anyone looking for the best performance making enlargements. I paid $180 for mine and I think it represents the best value for money of any photographic item I have ever purchased. Everything I do culminates in a print and alignment is usually the weakest link in a darkroom set up. Spirit levels and tape don't come close to cutting it. The time it has saved is enormous and the stress and general irritation evaporated. If I want perfect crisp grain right out to the corner, as well as on centre, from any neg at any enlargement size, I can have it. Predictably. Every time. I am being serious when I say that if someone told me I could never buy or sell another item of photo kit and had to drop one that I already own, I would give up my 24 Summillux asph before the laser alignment tool.
    True that! Not only in the drkrm. but in the field, shooting as well. Perfect for placing view camera standards in true parallel planes - a real mood stabilizer when doing swings and tilts at $20 an exposure.

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