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  1. #1

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    dodging and burning multiple areas on a single print

    I'm not too smart when it comes to printing and can either dodge or burn only one area in a print.

    Reading various books on printing, they specify various areas in a negative to burn in or dodge (stated in either additional/less time or in percentages) but do not necessarily state how this is done.

    How would this be done without affecting the base time given the rest of the print?

  2. #2
    ann
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    You have to figure out which sections need how much or how little. Then take the base time and add /subtract each section. It helps to make yourself a grid pattern and check off sections as you work. Hopefully you don't have a large number of these to track.

    for example the over all time for an exposure is 22 sec. you want to dodge out 4 secs in two areas, so the last 8 sec of the 22 would be divided into 2 actions, each getting a 4 sec dodge. Then which areas need a burn and do them one at a time.

    Hope this makes sense.
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

  3. #3

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    First it is helpful to have an audible timer or electric metronome sounding a one second intervals. You can easily make your own dodging and burning tools with mat board and a thin stiff piece of wire. For dodging cut the size and shape and tape it to the wire handle. For burning cut a hole in a piece of mat board probably best not to have distinct edges. You can also use your hands. A foot pedal for the timer is a real plus. Make test prints so you know where on the print and how much time is needed. I find my overall exposure and do any dodging during that time and burn after. I have a variable contrast lamp in my enlarger and can burn at various contrasts. If you are using filters it can still be done but you would have to change the filter accordingly. Generally your b/d tools should be somewhat above the paper and keep them moving so as not to have the print look as though it has been burned or dodged. Of course, the less you have to do the better. Sometimes bleaching is necessary but that is a different subject. Practice and it will come to you. There are also masks that can be made but that too is a different subject.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  4. #4
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    Here's one from a cool guy, from 5:00 ->
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewcsEHi8Vbg

    Some more:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z7fcPUOu-Lw

    http://youtu.be/M08tqnISnnk

    http://youtu.be/Xv9XQe40yl4

    Personally, I like to find the base exposure first, say 35s, then create a rouch scetch of which areas need more (+4, +8 etc) and which ones needs less (-4, -2 etc), then make a new exposure, minus the largest dodge value (in this case -4), apply that over the whole image, then expose the rest of the image only for remainder of the base exposure, blocking out the areas I want to dodge. After that, I burn in the rest, trough masking techniques you see in the youtube links.
    - I'm still a newb though, but it has worked well so far =)
    Last edited by Helinophoto; 12-15-2011 at 08:58 AM. Click to view previous post history.
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    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
    Visit my photography blog at: http://helino-photo.blogspot.com

  5. #5

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    Thanks All,

    I think this makes sense to me. So I would get the base exposure, then subtract the sum total of all of my areas of dodging, and then dodge each section sequentially. After this is finished, I would start burning. Hope fully, there would be only 2 or 3 areas that would be different from the base exposure.

    Quote Originally Posted by ann View Post
    You have to figure out which sections need how much or how little. Then take the base time and add /subtract each section. It helps to make yourself a grid pattern and check off sections as you work. Hopefully you don't have a large number of these to track.

    for example the over all time for an exposure is 22 sec. you want to dodge out 4 secs in two areas, so the last 8 sec of the 22 would be divided into 2 actions, each getting a 4 sec dodge. Then which areas need a burn and do them one at a time.

    Hope this makes sense.

  6. #6
    ann
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    yep, and it is rare that you would need to make more than a few adjustments. However, I have seen some very complicated printing maps. I.E. Richard Avedon's prints look lilke a topological map.

    You might try to find a book by Larry Bartlett called "Black and White Photographic Printing Workshop". He was at one time considered a master printer (he is no longer alive), but the book is very good with examples, etc.

    Of , course there are others out there with books that can be helpful, google Tim Rudman, Les McLean, for a few as there are others who have written helpful booiks.
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

  7. #7
    ROL
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    Making a Fine Art Print (base exposure, dodging & burning sequence)

  8. #8
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    I have that Bartlett book (among many many other printing tutorial books) and can attest that it's one of the best out there.
    "There is a time and place for all things, the difficulty is to use them only in their proper time and places." -- Robert Henri

  9. #9
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    WHOOOHOOOOO!!!!! 500 POSTS!!!!! Yes, I know I'm ridiculous.
    "There is a time and place for all things, the difficulty is to use them only in their proper time and places." -- Robert Henri

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by ROL View Post
    Making a Fine Art Print (base exposure, dodging & burning sequence)
    Thanks for the link. Even though it appears complicated at first, it appears quite straightforward and logical. Hopefully my experiences in the darkroom will be just as easy. I will start out with just 2 or 3 areas to modify.

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